When do Does drop fawns???

Bailey Boat

Ten Pointer
It's nothing unusual to see deer in the small patch of woods behind my house but their always just passing through as there isn't anything to eat but acorns in the fall. Today however I've seen a doe hanging around almost all day. She is just milling around the area, doesn't seem to be focused on anything in particular. I got out my spotting scope and looked over the area very carefully but can't see anything but her. I don't want to go into the area and have kept Lucy away for fear of spooking her away.
Is it possible that she has dropped a fawn and is keeping an eye on it until it can travel and follow her??
 

lasttombstone

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
The gestation period for whitetail deer is 201 days or about 6.7 months. Given a normal rut in this area beginning about early November one would expect to see the first fawns around mid May I think. In areas with a sever imbalance between bucks and does I would expect some does were not bread till sometime in January or later which mean they won't drop till as late as early August or later. In your case, I would think it is highly unlikely that she has a fawn now.
 

Deerherder

Eight Pointer
I saw some very small fawn tracks last weekend. I probably could have covered the track with the tips of my index & middle fingers. I really didn’t think too much of it, but that must have been an early dropped fawn.
 

Bailey Boat

Ten Pointer
I was out this morning at first light and she was bedded down behind a log, all I could see was her head. I'm going to just watch and stay clear just in case....
 

Buxndiverdux

Old Mossy Horns
I saw some very small fawn tracks last weekend. I probably could have covered the track with the tips of my index & middle fingers. I really didn’t think too much of it, but that must have been an early dropped fawn.
One thing to keep in mind is the feral piggies. To the untrained eye, they look like fawn tracks and produce offspring year round. There may not be any where you are, but they are around.
 

Deerherder

Eight Pointer
One thing to keep in mind is the feral piggies. To the untrained eye, they look like fawn tracks and produce offspring year round. There may not be any where you are, but they are around.

As the famous Talladega Nights quote goes, “Don’t you put that evil on me” regarding the feral pigs. 😃

It’s a fair point though. We haven’t seen any hogs on this farm & these tracks didn’t have any larger hog-like tracks nearby so I hope they aren’t little piggies. That said, it is in Wilson Co. & I know that eventually the pigs in Greene & Johnston counties will find their way to us.
 
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lasttombstone

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
I suppose I expounded too much on my original post. The answer would be 201 days from when the doe was bred so the rest is just conjecture.
 

Bailey Boat

Ten Pointer
She was still hanging around Tuesday morning but haven't seen her since. I spent some time yesterday afternoon watching the plot but she was no where to be seen. I guess she's moved on, I'll check the woods carefully today for sign....
 

GSOHunter

Twelve Pointer
Contributor
Saw two fawns the other day behind southern states in summfield. They had almost lost their spots.
 

Bailey Boat

Ten Pointer
Follow up: I checked the woods carefully and could only find where she bedded down, no signs of giving birth or of another deer. Maybe she just wanted to hang out for a day or two to rest and chose my woods to do it.
 

beavercleaver

Four Pointer
201 days or 6.5 months after the rut ..depends on your location of when the rut is ,but that is the gesttion period of whitetail deer
 

bryguy

Old Mossy Horns
As the famous Talladega Nights quote goes, “Don’t you put that evil on me” regarding the feral pigs.

It’s a fair point though. We haven’t seen any hogs on this farm & these tracks didn’t have any larger hog-like tracks nearby so I hope they aren’t little piggies. That said, it is in Wilson Co. & I know that eventually the pigs in Greene & Johnston counties will find their way to us.
They are already in the western part of the county. I have them and my farmer traps the hell out of them.


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The does in our trail-camera photos the past two weeks look like they're about to bust. I'd put them down as a month away -- early May.
 

lasttombstone

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
I hadn't even thought about it till looking at this thread again. I haven't seen a doe that even LOOKS pregnant.
 

roundball

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
One of the Does that started here in the backyard as an injured fawn 3 years ago, is as big as a barrel again.
Has come back 2 summers in a row to raise her fawns with us.

Been taking apple cores & a coffee can of corn out to her ( and a few of her crew ) 2-3 times a week, to keep her in the habit of coming here, hoping she'll drop in the woods behind the house again and we'll enjoy her & fawns every day until October again.
 
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