What browse tree grows well in wet condition?

DBCooper

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
I have a property that has a small pond on it. It only holds water for a short(ish) period of time, of course .... depending on rain amount. It’s holding about a foot or less, right now. Some seasons it never holds water. I figure it’s 2/3 ac.

What could I plant that would:

1. Be good browse
2. Survive a really moist (potentially) bed?

Next question is gonna be.....how do I plant (___________)?

Thanks.
 

stilker

Old Mossy Horns
Deer love privet hedge and it would do awesome there but if you ever wanted it gone it's a nightmare to get rid of.
 

sky hawk

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
I've never planted a tree for browse. But I did plant 10 river birches in a low wet spot and only 3 made it past a bush because of deer browsing. The most common trees growing in really wet conditions are willow, birch, and cypress.

Why do you want to plant trees in a pond?
 

DBCooper

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
I've never planted a tree for browse. But I did plant 10 river birches in a low wet spot and only 3 made it past a bush because of deer browsing. The most common trees growing in really wet conditions are willow, birch, and cypress.

Why do you want to plant trees in a pond?
Well, the pond is the only place I know if that’ll receive ample sunlight. This in in a stand of mature hardwoods. I have mast-producers. I have a section of cover. What I don’t have is winter browse.

The “pond” only holds water, occasionally. Most times I go in there, it’s a bed of soggy or dry leaves.
 

Eric Revo

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
You may look into vetch or some clovers...both can grow and thrive in occasional wet conditions. I don't know of many mast trees that would do well with roots that stay wet all the time, some oaks can survive occasional submerged roots but I'm not sure you'd get to enjoy the fruits of your labor since they are usually slow to mature.
Grapes can do well around the pond but probably not in the wettest areas.
 

sky hawk

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
Browse is so ubiquitous in natural vegetation, it's not something I plant for. I'm not sure it's worth the cost and effort unless it's highly attractive. I'd be more inclined to dig it out a little in the middle to hold more water and plant some soft mast around the edges.
 

DBCooper

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
I can buy 100 red ozier dogwoods for $171.

Supposedly, they love these (for winter browse)?????
 

DBCooper

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
Browse is so ubiquitous in natural vegetation, it's not something I plant for. I'm not sure it's worth the cost and effort unless it's highly attractive. I'd be more inclined to dig it out a little in the middle to hold more water and plant some soft mast around the edges.
I hadn’t thought of digging in there.

Thanks
 

dobber

Twelve Pointer
Yeah i would likely look at digging it deeper and trying to keep the pond. My buddy in Wisc has micro food plots all over his property and he dug out lots of ponds, some smaller than a kids wading pool, but he has deer showing up getting their pics taken. He notes that its one thing that people miss when doing property managing for deer, them water spots can be the difference in keeping deer on your property or the neighbors
 

Wildlifer

Twelve Pointer
Depending on pressure planting something for browse may be a futile effort. The deer will hit the best available food source and if that’s your planted plant I wouldn’t expect them to last long. Might want to look into managing for the natural seed bed and trying to turn the soil over every few years. Work on getting rid of undesirables and invasive that pop up and cultivate the good ones.
 

nccatfisher

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
He should’ve suggested multiflora rose... it’s MUCH better....


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I honestly believe it is easier to get rid of. I eradicated a bunch of it off this place FAIRLY easy with a spray program once I bush hogged it down and kept after the young shoots that kept coming back. But it isn't to be scoffed at.

Deer do love the young shoots off it though.
 

georgeeebuck

Six Pointer
I have a property that has a small pond on it. It only holds water for a short(ish) period of time, of course .... depending on rain amount. It’s holding about a foot or less, right now. Some seasons it never holds water. I figure it’s 2/3 ac.

What could I plant that would:

1. Be good browse
2. Survive a really moist (potentially) bed?

Next question is gonna be.....how do I plant (___________)?

Thanks.
Willow should work. Just cut sticks and stick them in the wet dirt. They will root and the deer will love them.
 

stilker

Old Mossy Horns
I honestly believe it is easier to get rid of. I eradicated a bunch of it off this place FAIRLY easy with a spray program once I bush hogged it down and kept after the young shoots that kept coming back. But it isn't to be scoffed at.

Deer do love the young shoots off it though.
my uncle planted a row a couple of hundred feet long between him and his neighbor and kept it cutback ,made the prettiest hedge boundary you've ever seen.
 

DBCooper

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
Question — how prominent is box elder in the triad? Doing some research, ive learned low hinge cutting these trees creates good browse.
 

DBCooper

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
I walked the property, yesterday. There are lots of box elder. I’m checking to see if I can hinge cut some of these. They’re actually quite prominent.
 

Justin

Old Mossy Horns
I walked the property, yesterday. There are lots of box elder. I’m checking to see if I can hinge cut some of these. They’re actually quite prominent.
they’re the cockroach of trees and hard to kill. Should handle browse well and deer eat about any fresh green browse
 
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