Tree of the day

curdog

Ten Pointer
Contributor
There was was a similar thread on another forum that seemed pretty popular. There seems to be a lot of knowledge and intrest in tree species with our folks on the forum.But I'll start this one by posting the first tree of the day. You can post a tree that you already can identify and see if anyone else can guess it or post one that you are unsure of and hopefully get some help identifying it.
Try to post some clues or hints, such as the general part of the state, description of where it's growing, anything else that may be helpful.

The first tree will be a common species that is found throughout the state and is native to NC
20200705_140502.jpg
The young trees have horizontal lenticles (the lines in the bark).
20200705_140502.jpg
20200705_140241.jpg
The leaves are simple with serrate or finely serrate margins ( the edges are not smooth)and they have an alternate arrangement. The tree has white flowers in the spring and a dark purple to black fruit that is currently on the tree. The fruit is ate by a variety of wildlife.
20200705_140122.jpg
As the tree grows it gets a scaly appearance, but may have a few of the horizontal lenticles.
This is a popular timber species and has unique colored wood that is used in a variety of woodworking items. In NC, the best quality is typically in the mountains above 3500+/- feet
 

curdog

Ten Pointer
Contributor
Wild or choke cherry?
Yes, wild cherry or black cherry
prunus serotina,.
This was the tree closest to my front door, so it got the ball rolling. I'll look for some more, or others can pick up the slack for me
 

turkeyfoot

Old Mossy Horns
I hate them wild cherry trees they pop up every where I cut em down young. Waiting hear on 2nd is it whit pine?
 

curdog

Ten Pointer
Contributor
Just got back in from the garden and grabbed species number two before the rain came in
20200705_164135.jpg
This species is in the white oak group. The leaves are simple and have 5 lobes and the middle two are squared off giving it an appearance of a cross. The twig is gray with gray to reddish brown hairs. Found statewide and is usually on drier sites. Acorns are 1/2-2/3" long with the cap covering 1/3-1/2 of the nut. They mature in one year.
Some areas use them in fencing.
 

Justin

Old Mossy Horns
Q
Just got back in from the garden and grabbed species number two before the rain came in
View attachment 46882
This species is in the white oak group. The leaves are simple and have 5 lobes and the middle two are squared off giving it an appearance of a cross. The twig is gray with gray to reddish brown hairs. Found statewide and is usually on drier sites. Acorns are 1/2-2/3" long with the cap covering 1/3-1/2 of the nut. They mature in one year.
Some areas use them in fencing.
Q. stellata..... or am I barred from playing? Top two fav tree to climb.
 

curdog

Ten Pointer
Contributor
Q

Q. stellata..... or am I barred from playing? Top two fav tree to climb.
You may have a slight advantage, but not barred. Mine may be 10 feet tall, so not much for climbing.
You can get some up close pictures to post from 80 feet...
 

josh

Twelve Pointer
4688546886

An easy one, several shade my driveway

Opposite arrangement, compound leaf, in the maple genus
 

curdog

Ten Pointer
Contributor
20200706_160527.jpg
Here is another tree found statewide. Simple and alternate leaves. No hairs on the twigs or leaves. You can see the three different shapes of the leaves; oval, mitten shaped and 3 lobed. Used to make teas, medicine and was the original flavor in root beer
 

Justin

Old Mossy Horns
View attachment 46926
Here is another tree found statewide. Simple and alternate leaves. No hairs on the twigs or leaves. You can see the three different shapes of the leaves; oval, mitten shaped and 3 lobed. Used to make teas, medicine and was the original flavor in root beer
Said to be a potential carcinogen
 
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