Trapping questions. Tracks and sign.

Jammer

Four Pointer
#62
Man, quit using that rebar. Here is a pic from today of a yote that spent the night and ALL day (until 4:30 pm) in the trap staked with a 12" berkshire cable stake in sand. The ground was level yesterday when the trap was set. Look at how much dirt was moved with her trying to get loose.
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JoeR

Four Pointer
Thread starter #63
Man, quit using that rebar. Here is a pic from today of a yote that spent the night and ALL day (until 4:30 pm) in the trap staked with a 12" berkshire cable stake in sand. The ground was level yesterday when the trap was set. Look at how much dirt was moved with her trying to get loose.
That's crazy! You'll need a bobcat to level that again. They sure do move some earth.
 

SkeeBo

Button Buck
#65
Glad you got one to step on the pan but sorry to here about the staking issue.

A single rebar stake is usually OK to anchor a DP for coon because they are not prone to pumping the stake. The coyote will jump and with a short chain and single stake, even if he does not jerk it out of the ground right away, he will continue to jerk and pull the stake a little bit each jerk (what we call pumping the stake) until he eventually gets it out of the ground.

Rebar is fine to anchor canine traps but it needs to be 2 stakes driven in an X pattern so the chain does not pull parallel to the stake. There are several double stake swivels made to accommodate 2 stakes. JC Connors chestnut rings work well also. If the weight of the rebar is not an issue, rebar is one of if not the most cost effective way to anchor your trap in most soil types. And they are much easier to remove than most earth anchors.

And if you have more than 8" of chain, you need a shock spring as well.
What do you prefer stakes or earth anchors? Most folks seem to like the earth anchor....stakes are considered old school?
 

QuietButDeadly

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
#66
SkeeBo, I use both and I also throw some drags into the mix. Earth anchors are lighter to carry than stakes or drags but I trap off my side by side so the extra weight is not an issue. And stakes are much easier to pull when I am ready to move the trap.
 

41magnum

Eight Pointer
#67
What do you prefer stakes or earth anchors?
Marshall,
Neither, I prefer drags. 95% of the time. Old school they used "clogs" made of a pc of log or rock.
Since I trap woods roads or woods edges, I PRE-HOOK drags so I don't have to look any further than chains length, 6 ft, so if a coon or cat climbs, I can dispatch easy, no more than head high.
Hvy Duty Berkshire earth anchors when not using drags--5%
I don't have theft problems either whereas some folks would/do.
Even before my back problems started, I was using drags. I don't want to drive stakes, and pull them later. I can make 3 sets using drags in the time it takes to make 2 sets using stakes--which need pulled later...more labor/time.
 

QuietButDeadly

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
#71
I usually pre-hook the anchor which keeps the critter within the length of the chain from the anchor point. As John said, it is quicker to make a set with a drag...no hammering stakes or earth anchors. It is also easier and quicker when you pull the trap.

But there are other benefits of using drags. It allows to animal more freedom of movement and may allow them to get out of the open and have some cover. And that IMO keeps them more calm and they do not fight the trap as hard.

It also allows them to get away from the trap bed so the area around the trap is not torn up like it is with stakes or earth anchors and short chains. That torn up circle around a short chained trap anchored solid is referred to as a catch circle or burn circle. It will smell like the caught animal but visually it sticks out like a sore thumb. Some critter are attracted to the catch circle but will not go into the circle itself.

I like being able to put the trap back in the same trap bed for the remake, especially on blind trail sets where I do not use and bait of lure.

There are disadvantages as well. If not pre hooked, some critters like coyotes may drag them a long way before they get tangled up enough to hold them. Then the trapper has to spend time trying to follow drag marks to find the animal and their equipment, hopefully still attached to the critter. Some drags leave a lot better trail than others and some will hang up a lot better than others.

They are another tool in the tool box.