Tendinitis and shooting

Roanoke

Four Pointer
I guess that it has finally caught up with me and have only bow hunted for the past fifteen years. Went to Orthopedic yesterday and got a shot of cortisone. Dr. told me not to shoot for three weeks. Going to take poundage down but need to get back up as soon as possible. Got a busy hunting schedule coming up. Was planing on taking some plaines game in RSA in August and Idaho in Sept. Cross bow is not an option for me because I am determined to get a Pope and Young bull.
 
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mjbrady

Twelve Pointer
Once you are ready to shoot again, there are only moral victories to be won by shooting a lot of shots. What I mean by that is, high concentration low rep shots are better for you vs drawing back and firing and not concentrating on the task of making a good shot. You need a shot that is repeatable and easy to get off. Work on your anchor, sight picture and breathing vs “building up” your muscles with a lot of shots. I wish you the best in your recovery and with your upcoming hunt.
 

ABolt

Twelve Pointer
Contributor
Where was the shot given - elbow, shoulder, ?

Typically the PT for tendinitis involves exercises, ultrasound, and sometimes electro-stimulus to repair the micro-tears. Are you doing PT in the meantime?

Also like MJBrady's advice above. Remember, "90% of the game is half mental".
 

Roanoke

Four Pointer
Elbow. No PT yet. I guess after follow up. Not as sore today as it has been. Actually got some sleep last night. Suppose to not shoot, surf or much of any action that requires arm until then. Good thing I got a knob on the wheel so I can steer boat.
 
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Ol Copper

Eight Pointer
I'll echo what mjbrady said...pounding targets with repetition to build yourself up may prove to be futile. In fact, the closer I get to hunting season, my shooting time decreases. I usually shoot 1 or 2 quality shots per day and no more, focusing on my anchor, shot execution and follow thru. I want to replicate that 1 quality shot that Im going to take when actually hunting.
 

CBB1

Spike
Without PT and a rehab plan you are getting on a pain roller coaster. Shots are a very short term solution. You owe it to yourself to learn how to rehab your body. You are stuck with it.


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Roanoke

Four Pointer
Good advice. I agree with the first shot scenario. Same as shooting a rifle off of the sticks. The ones that normally hold too long make bad shots. Initiate the mechanism and stay focused on the kill zone, but shoot as quick as possible!

First time I killed a Cape Buffalo was because the client stayed on the sticks too long and made a bad shot. I was doing my apprenticeship but had to shoot when the Buffalo charged. Not what any guide wants to happen but it was a safety issue.

I have a good deal to lean to compromise for this injury. Tried to shoulder a shotgun today for the upcoming DU Skeet tournament and it hurt like hell. Worst is that it seems to be most painful at night when I am trying to sleep. I am one of those people that have to get sleep.
 
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Weekender

Twelve Pointer
I have a torn RC, arthritis, and a torn biceps tendon in my non-shooting arm (left). My good shoulder hasn't had an MRI yet but it's starting to feel similarly.

I went AMA and turned down surgery and am rehabbing it with lifestyle changes. I no longer bench press or use a barbell for resistance training. This alone helped tremendously. Dumbbells and bands allow you to keep your palm in a direction least destructive to the shoulder joint.

I ice both shoulders even when they aren't hurting. I changed the angle of my steering wheel for driving.

I never shoot the bow more than six times per session and I never shoot two days in a row. I use 70 lb draw.
 

longrifle

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
Believe me when I tell you that the shots are only a temporary stopgap, I'm scheduled for my 4th round later this month after getting them every 90 days. They use to last pretty much until the next series before the pain became almost debilitating again. Now it's less than half that. I'm at the point now where I'll be discussing total shoulder replacement on my next visit....
 

Roanoke

Four Pointer
How did you angle you steering wheel? I have been driving with my non injury arm but keep using both out of habit. All of your feedback is helpful and greatly appreciated!
 

GSOHunter

Twelve Pointer
Contributor
Believe me when I tell you that the shots are only a temporary stopgap, I'm scheduled for my 4th round later this month after getting them every 90 days. They use to last pretty much until the next series before the pain became almost debilitating again. Now it's less than half that. I'm at the point now where I'll be discussing total shoulder replacement on my next visit....
Depending on what the problem is a shot can work. I had shoulder surgery to fix a tear and was still having some pain in the shoulder. The Dr. gave me a shot in the AC joint and the pain was gone the next day. For the post part it has been gone except when I paddle too much on a kayak.
 

longrifle

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
MRIs showed severe osteoarthritis in my left (bow) shoulder. Lol, after the first couple of rounds of shots I had I felt like I could do handstands all the way back to my truck when I walked out of the hospital. Went back to my normal work routine, started practicing again, even shot a couple of tournaments. Didn't take long before I realised the error of that....

Archery has been a major part of my life as long as I can remember and competitive archery was even more so. My brother and my son are now stepping up to take care of the workload, I'm going to deal strictly with customers and materials. I'll soon see what kind of toll the repetitive action of slinging metal panels up on a roof for the past 18 years was taking.

Trust me to tell ya, I'll put off surgery as long as I still have reasonable use of my arm.....but if they told me that after the surgery I could resume a full tournament schedule next season? I'd hand them the scalpel myself ...
 

beard&bow

Ten Pointer
Contributor
MRIs showed severe osteoarthritis in my left (bow) shoulder. Lol, after the first couple of rounds of shots I had I felt like I could do handstands all the way back to my truck when I walked out of the hospital. Went back to my normal work routine, started practicing again, even shot a couple of tournaments. Didn't take long before I realised the error of that....

Archery has been a major part of my life as long as I can remember and competitive archery was even more so. My brother and my son are now stepping up to take care of the workload, I'm going to deal strictly with customers and materials. I'll soon see what kind of toll the repetitive action of slinging metal panels up on a roof for the past 18 years was taking.

Trust me to tell ya, I'll put off surgery as long as I still have reasonable use of my arm.....but if they told me that after the surgery I could resume a full tournament schedule next season? I'd hand them the scalpel myself ...
After seeing several people undergo multiple shoulder surgeries over the course of eight years, I'll pass. That was under a military knife though. I'm sure the fellas doing it in civilian world are better but, I've witnessed some horror stories.

One of my best friends had surgery when we got back from deployment. During his post-op exam, the surgeon apologized to him and explained that he removed too much and suggested amputation. NOPE! That settled it for me. I'll use mine until I can't function with it. At that point, what ever happens, happens.

In the event my wife tells me to have surgery, I'll have to pretend like it was my decision. She has to beat me over the head to take an NSAID. I haven't taken a pill, that wasn't a vitamin, since I had diverticulitis a year and a half ago. And I'm in no rush to take another one.
 

Weekender

Twelve Pointer
How did you angle you steering wheel? I have been driving with my non injury arm but keep using both out of habit. All of your feedback is helpful and greatly appreciated!
If your vehicle will let you lower your steering wheel, it helps tremendously. I've tilted mine much lower so that when I absolutely have to put my hands at 10 and 2, my hands aren't reaching upwards as much, nor are my arms fully extended.
 

Buxndiverdux

Old Mossy Horns
I guess that it has finally caught up with me and have only bow hunted for the past fifteen years. Went to Orthopedic yesterday and got a shot of cortisone. Dr. told me not to shoot for three weeks. Going to take poundage down but need to get back up as soon as possible. Got a busy hunting schedule coming up. Was planing on taking some plaines game in RSA in August and Idaho in Sept. Cross bow is not an option for me because I am determined to get a Pope and Young bull.
I dropped to 65lbs or less about 3-4 years ago when I noticed some discomfort after a backyard shooting session. Hopefully a precautionary move to limit damage.
 

DC-DXT

Twelve Pointer
I’ve just been fully released from elbow surgery (golfer’s elbow) and have started lifting weights again. I’m going to drop my poundage back to about 60lbs before I start shooting. Considering keeping poundage at 60lbs, but want to see how my elbow responds first.
 

longrifle

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
The only benefit of drawing all that weight is increased range. Fine if your body is up to the task. I've always looked at bowhunting as a lot more up close and personal. A scary sharp broadhead, even out of a 45# longbow, will blow through the average Carolina whitetail with no problem unless you hit major bone.
 

Guybo

Eight Pointer
The only benefit of drawing all that weight is increased range. Fine if your body is up to the task. I've always looked at bowhunting as a lot more up close and personal. A scary sharp broadhead, even out of a 45# longbow, will blow through the average Carolina whitetail with no problem unless you hit major bone.
I agree!, I've been involved in archery a very long time and found this to be true. I use to shoot 80lb bows then went down to 70lb then 60lb and have been shooting a 50lb bow for the last 12yrs. I have bad shoulders and elbows and have had numerous bouts of tendinitis over the years and I have no doubt that pulling heavy poundage bow contributed to most of my problems.

Archery equipment has come a long way since the heavy poundage, big aluminum arrows and overdraws. With todays equipment and set-ups there's just no reason to shoot high poundage unless you just want to and are physically able to pull the weight. I haven't had any problems with tendinitis since I started shooting 50lbs and I can shoot it comfortably and as much as I want. As for penetration and pass thru's on deer I've had zero issues at 50lbs with Goldtip xt's and a 100gr Thunderhead and I wouldn't hesitate to shoot an elk with this set-up. My daughter shoots 42lbs with equal results on deer. As mentioned, you have to stay out of the shoulder and take good shots and if you put a sharp broadhead thru the vitals it's gonna kill.

Tendinitis is no joke and I once missed an entire archery season because of it. Rest, heat, ice and over the counter Naproxen is what worked best for me. Once I did start shooting again If I remember correctly I started at 40lbs and also used an elbow brace and another type brace that the doc recommended that wraps around the forearm (I think it's called a tennis elbow brace) but i'm not sure. Good luck, I hope it clears up for you.
 
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