Stevens .22/410

FireDuck401

Eight Pointer
Contributor
I recently acquired a Stevens .22/410 over and under.
The stock is loose from the receiver, and has some play side to side.
The stock and fore end are some sort of wood grain plastic, which I don’t particularly like.

Anyway, anyone have an idea on how I can fix this issue? The gun was my grandpas, and I’d love to take it squirrel hunting sometime but I’m leary with the stock condition.
 

45/70 hunter

Twelve Pointer
Sounds like a Tenite stock. Check out the Savage 24 forum I think it's called, been a long time since I was over there.
 

Hazmt

Spike
I know this may be an obvious question, But did you take the butt-plate off and tighten the stock bolt? I recently picked up a double with the 'tenite' stock. The stock bolt was loose enough to turn with my fingers. Takes a long slotted screw-driver. Savage over/unders are notorious for cracked stocks in the wrist-area. Stoegers are also. Keep the butt-stock bolts tight -a little drop of blue locktite will help!
 

FireDuck401

Eight Pointer
Contributor
I know this may be an obvious question, But did you take the butt-plate off and tighten the stock bolt? I recently picked up a double with the 'tenite' stock. The stock bolt was loose enough to turn with my fingers. Takes a long slotted screw-driver. Savage over/unders are notorious for cracked stocks in the wrist-area. Stoegers are also. Keep the butt-stock bolts tight -a little drop of blue locktite will help!
I did not! Thanks for the tip!
I’d just put it back in the safe.
 

nccatfisher

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
Actually remove the bolt out of the stock and shine a light in and look good. They were bad to bust out where the bolt and washer seated. If it isn’t bad you can fill it with epoxy and redrill it. If you just cinch the bolt down if it is busted you will have a mess. It won’t take but a few minutes to check it.
 

Eric Revo

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
Actually a good idea to take it off and use JB weld to fill in around the edge and add a fender washer with JB weld to the stock bolt taking care to put plenty of wax or mold release compound on that bolt and on the receiver that my meet the stock. That will keep you from having trouble down the line with that stock cracking or breaking at the receiver. I've done this to not only the plastic stocks but wood stocks as well that had wallowed around and gotten loose. It's easy and you only have to do it once. Make sure you put some kind of sealant on the stock bolt, either locktite or fingernail polish will work.
Once the epoxy is dry, remove the stock and clean up any excess that you can see and I can almost guarantee that you will never have problems out of that stock again.
 
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