Shark Tooth Diving

cuppednlocked

Eight Pointer
I've spent many hours underwater in the lowcountry of SC looking for fossils. The interesting thing about the SC rivers is the fact that there is often a jumbled mix of material on the bottom. You can find chubutensis or auriculatus teeth next to a meg. You never really know what you might find. Here in NC the rivers seem to be more stratified. You can go to one river and find the auriculatus and another for megs.

Here's an often overlooked fact about the teeth:

The side most people look at is actually the back (lingual) side. The side of the tooth that you would see as the shark was headed toward you (labial) is actually the flat side.
 
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Wildlifer

Twelve Pointer
I've spent many hours underwater in the lowcountry of SC looking for fossils. The interesting thing about the SC rivers is the fact that there often a jumbled mix of material on the bottom. You can find chubutensis or auriculatus teeth next to a meg. You never really know what you might find. Here in NC the rivers seem to be more stratified. You can go to one river and find the auriculatus and another for megs.

Here's an often overlooked fact about the teeth:

The side most people look at is actually the back (lingual) side. The side of the tooth that you would see as the shark was headed toward you (labial) is actually the flat side.
The tooth side still strikes me as odd.
 

wRick

Button Buck
For people interested in value, I recommend Megateeth.com

Bill is a great guy and finds all the teeth himself.

I've gone diving with him several times off the NC coast and a couple times in Georgia.

I lost my tooth bag once in a pitch black river and he said: "Oh, I know where you were, I'll probably find it tomorrow."

I was thinking "Yeah right, we're never gonna find that bag!"

Sure enough, he found it! Still had my whale tooth and nearly 3" Mako inside.
 
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