Set ups and thoughts

careyhamil

Six Pointer
I’m starting this thread as a type of pro/con lessons learned or thoughts about your set up.

I’m shooting a Bowtech SR6, 70#, 27.5 inch draw. On performance mode. I have the Hamseka hunter pro micro rest, lucky draw stops, crossover stabilizer, Black Eagle rampage arrows, HHA King Pin TE sight. Tru fire hard core release, and schwaker broadheads.

- I love the draw on the bow, didn’t see a need for the comfort setting as the performance setting was just as comfortable. The one criticism of the bow is the cheap plastic grip. I may be in the minority, but it moves around and doesn’t feel like it is secured to the bow. In this high humidity and heat it gets very slick.
-Hamseka rest, love the rest, hate the spring. It seems like it the spring stretches when first set it up, and this causes the rest to creep a little. But once it settles it’s solid.
-HHA sight. Love it, I bought the 1 3/8 scope on it. Wish I had went with the 1 5/8. I use a 3/16 peep and I’m getting a fair amount of gap between the sight house and inner edge of the peep. I also purchased the 3 pin scope to go on this sight, but it hasn’t come in yet.
-Cross over stabilizer. Interesting product. Does the basics of what I need a stab to do. I have liked the ability to change the stab from 22 to 8 inches on the windy days. I typically shoot it at 11”.
-Tru fire Hard core. Fold under out the way when I’m pulling arrows, and is trigger pressure is adjustable. I’ve been shooting this release since it came out. Great wrist strap index fired release.
-Black Eagle arrows. Great arrows, were within advertised specs when I weighed each of them, they have flown well.
-Broadheads. Haven’t shot them at anything yet, so I have no input yet.
-Lucky stops. I like them. Give a solid back wall. And provide a micro tune ability to your draw length with the different sides of the stops. Good upgrade to the cheap cable stops from Bowtech.

I have yet to hunt with this set up, but I believe it is going to be very solid hunting bow. I am now able to shoot 50 yards and keep them in the ten ring on a hog 3d target. I have not been able to shoot much due to work and weather. I was not disappointed on my first 40 and 50 yard groups.

Pros: very smooth bow that holds well. Shooting 470 grain arrows, I’m getting a good fairly flat trajectory out to 40ish yards.
Cons: I don’t care for the grip, wish I had purchased the larger scope size for my sight, and didn’t care for the spring on the cord for the rest.


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DarrinG

Four Pointer
Sounds like a great setup. Are the broadheads expandables or fixed blades? Im a advocate for fixed blade heads myself. Your specs put you at 6.7 gpp for your hunting arrow. Personally I prefer a heavier arrow than that, but yours should get the job done. I like two holes, especially if hunting elevated and expect a higher entry. That lower exit will spill the blood on the ground, and a reputable fixed blade on a heavier arrow gives you a better chance of that especially if you hit bone. It sounds like you have confidence in your setup and I think that is a huge plus for any bowhunter...having confidence in your rig. Good luck this coming fall!
 

mjbrady

Twelve Pointer
Sounds like a great setup. Are the broadheads expandables or fixed blades? Im a advocate for fixed blade heads myself. Your specs put you at 6.7 gpp for your hunting arrow. Personally I prefer a heavier arrow than that, but yours should get the job done. I like two holes, especially if hunting elevated and expect a higher entry. That lower exit will spill the blood on the ground, and a reputable fixed blade on a heavier arrow gives you a better chance of that especially if you hit bone. It sounds like you have confidence in your setup and I think that is a huge plus for any bowhunter...having confidence in your rig. Good luck this coming fall!
His arrow weights 470gr he’s got to be shooting an arrow that weighs north of 12gpi. He has more than enough arrow weight and in some aspects a bit heavy (I don’t think you can be to heavy, but trajectory can become an issue at longer ranges). He want have any penetration issues mechanical or fixed.
 

DarrinG

Four Pointer
Bowhunting to me is a close range affair. 30 and under usually. Too much can happen with longer range shots...and that's my opinion. Ive personally seen too many wounded, non-recovered animals with long range shots with archery gear. I save those for firearms. A heavy arrow (within reason, I'm not talking excessive...) will penetrate better...every time. I've seen too many run off with 3/4 of the arrow flopping on the impact side. That's a "oh no" moment in my book.
 

mjbrady

Twelve Pointer
DarrinG, I’m totally with you on the heavier arrow being a better penetrating arrow. What would your total arrow weight be for the OP with his specs?
 

pattersonj11

Old Mossy Horns
You might like the scope having a gap when looking through the prep sight. In low light, it doesn’t hurt to have as many reference points as you can. That becomes an additional reference for alignment. Sometimes you can’t see everything and have to rely on additional reference points. I’ve had some instances where I could see through the peep but not clear enough to read if the sight was centered or not. If you can fall back on other holds or references, you are still able to make a decent shot.
 

perfectroadglide

Six Pointer
I may be the only person that doesn't grip my bow. I grip, draw, then open my grip so the bow grip rest in the web of my hand between my thumb and index finger. Never torque my shots this way.
 

FireDuck401

Eight Pointer
Contributor
Prime Centergy
Spott Hog Fast Eddie XL
Beestinger Hunter stabilizer
Trophy Ridge rest
Cool Hand Luke string stop
TreeLimb quiver
Pine Ridge whiskers and peep
Black Eagle Zombie Slayers
Sevr broadheads this year

I love everything on this bow except that rest.
Probably swap it out soon.


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DarrinG

Four Pointer
DarrinG, I’m totally with you on the heavier arrow being a better penetrating arrow. What would your total arrow weight be for the OP with his specs?
I like a 7.5 gpp and above hunting arrow. Gpi is good but you got to also consider the draw weight, which equates to gpp. I guess that's one reason why I am still shooting aluminum shafts, I can get the weight in the shaft itself without having to load up the front with brass inserts, etc on most carbons and stay in my bows preferred spine range. 8 gpp makes a dandy hunting arrow that hits with authority. However, just like anything, there is always the point of diminishing returns. I don't wanna lob arrows at 20 yards either, and I guess a guy can go to the fanatical side of anything, so talking within reason here. There is a point where you still get good trajectory (or "cast" as us old bowhunters call it) and great KE to drive an arrow home into the dirt on the exit of a deer or bear, etc. There's always the chance of a bone hit and having a reputable head with a good gpp arrow will maximize your chances of slicing the important stuff and getting good penetration to do just that. Dead game in a short time is what we're after.
 

careyhamil

Six Pointer
I typically look at total arrow weight first and FOC second. I think total arrow weight and arrow flight are much better indicators of performance than breaking this down into further numbers. I chose 470 gr over 560 gr, because it flew extremely flat out past 40 yards(comparatively speaking)and will deliver the momentum need to push a large schwacker through a red stag, as confirmed by the outfitter. While I don’t advocate for a min gpp, I think a lot of people use the Ashby study to sell heavy set ups, and nothing else. At 470 gr, my set up quietens down a good bit.

I hope this thread can be used as lessons learned and explanation as to how someone go to their set up.


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DarrinG

Four Pointer
Good info.
Ive never read Ashby's study and maybe one day when I have nothing better to do I will read it, but common sense tells me a heavier object will knock down a wall better than a light one, even if the heavier one is moving a tad slower. I think you're setup will work and you have confidence in it, and that's a HUGE plus. I personally think a heavier arrow would work better if you hit bone, etc, but that's just my preference. You seem to be prepared to shoot 40 yards plus at game and that's your prerogative. I practice out long ranges but my preferred range to launch an arrow at a live critter is 30 and under. Youre exactly right about arrow flight also. Too many guys think they are tuned but their setup wont shoot a fixed head, so they cover up the tuning with a mechanical. An arrow flying lame duck is being robbed of energy as soon as it leaves the bow until it contacts its intended target and results in poor penetration. An arrow going dead-nuts straight is carrying its energy to its max. Kudu's to you for having a well-tuned rig and recognizing that as a major contributor to arrow penetration performance also. I sure wish you well on your stag hunt!
 

mjbrady

Twelve Pointer
I like a 7.5 gpp and above hunting arrow. Gpi is good but you got to also consider the draw weight, which equates to gpp. I guess that's one reason why I am still shooting aluminum shafts, I can get the weight in the shaft itself without having to load up the front with brass inserts, etc on most carbons and stay in my bows preferred spine range. 8 gpp makes a dandy hunting arrow that hits with authority. However, just like anything, there is always the point of diminishing returns. I don't wanna lob arrows at 20 yards either, and I guess a guy can go to the fanatical side of anything, so talking within reason here. There is a point where you still get good trajectory (or "cast" as us old bowhunters call it) and great KE to drive an arrow home into the dirt on the exit of a deer or bear, etc. There's always the chance of a bone hit and having a reputable head with a good gpp arrow will maximize your chances of slicing the important stuff and getting good penetration to do just that. Dead game in a short time is what we're after.
I can see your logic here. With today’s arrows your options to get to that point would be very limited without adding brass inserts and such. Arrow weight is very important in my approach to my arrow builds and my suggestions for others arrow setups. Spine also has to be taken into consideration and at a 27.5 draw with an arrow being in the 27” range the issue of making an arrow to stiff can happen and the addition of point weight, either via the point or the insert may be needed vs having to drop down in Spine(which usually equates to a lower gpi arrow). The OP has built what appears to be a very solid arrow combination for his setup and he has almost maxed out his arrow weight relative to his desired spine. As with anything he has options but they do become less and less if he attempts to go up the ladder. The option of Aluminum is always available , but most guys have moved away from them from the durability aspect. Aluminum arrows had the best spine range we have ever had in arrows, you could literally change 3lbs of weight and move a shaft size they were that exact. I wish carbon could be that way but they just are not to that point yet. The FMJ line mixes the Aluminum of old and the carbon toughness of today for what I think personally to be the best hunting arrows made today. The smaller profile has less wind resistance and they have less surface drag once they reach the target increasing its penetration.

I’m glad to know there are a few guys still shooting Aluminum shafts, I wish I was still one some days when you are on the fence building an arrow for some setups. Kudos to you for keeping to what has worked for you.
 

DarrinG

Four Pointer
I’m glad to know there are a few guys still shooting Aluminum shafts, I wish I was still one some days when you are on the fence building an arrow for some setups. Kudos to you for keeping to what has worked for you.
Yeah, I'm still shooting Easton XX78's. Best arrow shaft I've ever shot. I've got plenty of carbons also but those XX78's shoot so darn well its hard to put`em away. The straightness and exact spine of them is still top-shelf. I don't shoot much 3-D and they are shot into a bag target or a bale for broadhead practice. Pull them out straight and they will stay straight for the most part. Once through a deer, well, I've had a lot survive it and a lot that didn't. I can get my desired hunting arrow weight with just the shaft and broadhead without having to buy up brass inserts, weights, etc. And darn those XX78's fly sooooo well outta my rig!
I also shoot aluminums out of my recurve. I think this is about 38 years shooting aluminum arrows of one sort or another, from both compounds and trad bows, so I know the spines and how to work with them easily. I'm sure one of these days I'll start hunting with some carbon shafts, but not just yet, LoL.
 

QBD2

Old Mossy Horns
Still slinging with my 'old' Hoyt Carbon Element.

I'm actually shooting a fairly light arrow, right at 400 grains total weight. 1.5" Spitfire up front, and I have zero penetration issues. My only complaint is that those BlueStreaks are expensive lol!

The only change I'll make before I get after elk is a fixed blade.
 

kilerhamilton

Twelve Pointer
Still slinging with my 'old' Hoyt Carbon Element.

I'm actually shooting a fairly light arrow, right at 400 grains total weight. 1.5" Spitfire up front, and I have zero penetration issues. My only complaint is that those BlueStreaks are expensive lol!

The only change I'll make before I get after elk is a fixed blade.
I shoot about 400gns also. Perfect for our whitetail.
I just picked up some wasp drones for my yearly fixed blade shoot out. Getting my 3 perfect arrows for my quiver ready. Any way they flew right with my slick tricks and field points to 60yds. Maybe a hair low.
Good little heads.
Think I’ll use em and shoot some deer. Tricks,Drones, and rage extreme in the line up for meat this year.
Bloodline 330 arrow


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mjbrady

Twelve Pointer
Still slinging with my 'old' Hoyt Carbon Element.

I'm actually shooting a fairly light arrow, right at 400 grains total weight. 1.5" Spitfire up front, and I have zero penetration issues. My only complaint is that those BlueStreaks are expensive lol!

The only change I'll make before I get after elk is a fixed blade.
If I could give you any advice it would be to at least go to a 125gr head for Elk. I’ve nver advised anyone to Elk hunt at under 425gr total arrow weight.
 

25contender

Twelve Pointer
For Elk I would use a arrow of at least 500 grains. I use arrow broadhead combination of 550gr +. A elk is a whole different beast. Sure you can get away with a lighter arrow if your shot is perfectly placed between two ribs. But most shots aren't that perfect. Also check the state regs where you will be hunting Elk, some have arrow weight minimums.
 
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