Save those persimmon trees

lasttombstone

Kinder, Gentler LTS
Contributor
I've got loads of persimmon trees and seedlings. I'm currently trying to identify the females, which there seem to be considerably less then the males in number, so I can get rid of the unwanted trees. So I was reading, trying to learn how to differentiate between the two and I learned a few interesting things. As it was mentioned in another thread, if there is a coffee shortage, or it gets unaffordable, roasted persimmon seeds can subtitute for coffee (@woodmoose). The fruit, fermented with cornmeal, will make beer, or it can be used to make brandy. A herbal tea is made from the leaves and, during the War of Northern Agression, persimmon seeds were used for buttons by many in the South.
 

luckybuck

Old Mossy Horns
I've got loads of persimmon trees and seedlings. I'm currently trying to identify the females, which there seem to be considerably less then the males in number, so I can get rid of the unwanted trees. So I was reading, trying to learn how to differentiate between the two and I learned a few interesting things. As it was mentioned in another thread, if there is a coffee shortage, or it gets unaffordable, roasted persimmon seeds can subtitute for coffee (@woodmoose). The fruit, fermented with cornmeal, will make beer, or it can be used to make brandy. A herbal tea is made from the leaves and, during the War of Northern Agression, persimmon seeds were used for buttons by many in the South.
I don't think there is a sure fire way to tell a male from female until it blooms but I have noticed over the years male trees tend to have more small branches and smaller leaves. A male tree produces a cluster of blooms and a female is a single bloom. They still produce fruit if unpollinated but it is seedless.
 

jcannon

Twelve Pointer
For me, it's a little harder to tell before they get a couple of years old. We had a ton where I used to hunt at. I want to plant some around here, but I don't have a lot of room. I'll probably just plant some Japanese Persimmon Trees just because I won't need a pollinator.
 

Aaron H

Twelve Pointer
Contributor
The most interesting thing that I've read about our native persimmon trees is that they can change sex. Might be female but when there's a need they become male.... I guess for the good of the community. After hurricane Fran in 1996 there were trees tipped over all across the land. I bought 250 persimmon seedlings and went walking. I stuck a seedling at the rootball of SO MANY fallen trees. I went on lots of people's land and left trees. Sort of a Johnny Persimmonseed thing I guess. We have a ton of persimmon trees in this area. Maybe partly from my effort but also those years when the conditions are just right the possums and coons drop the seeds and they become trees. Back to your post.... the males have flowers sort of in a row on the stems- lots of flowers.
 

GTO ONE

Eight Pointer
For me, it's a little harder to tell before they get a couple of years old. We had a ton where I used to hunt at. I want to plant some around here, but I don't have a lot of room. I'll probably just plant some Japanese Persimmon Trees just because I won't need a pollinator.
I’ve been down this road…. You don’t want Asian persimmons, they generally don’t fall off the tee like natives, they just hang. You end up with coons and grinners braking your trees…
 

jcannon

Twelve Pointer
I’ve been down this road…. You don’t want Asian persimmons, they generally don’t fall off the tee like natives, they just hang. You end up with coons and grinners braking your trees…
Interesting, I knew they stayed on the tree longer, but never thought about coons and opossums
 

JONOV

Twelve Pointer
I've got loads of persimmon trees and seedlings. I'm currently trying to identify the females, which there seem to be considerably less then the males in number, so I can get rid of the unwanted trees. So I was reading, trying to learn how to differentiate between the two and I learned a few interesting things. As it was mentioned in another thread, if there is a coffee shortage, or it gets unaffordable, roasted persimmon seeds can subtitute for coffee (@woodmoose). The fruit, fermented with cornmeal, will make beer, or it can be used to make brandy. A herbal tea is made from the leaves and, during the War of Northern Agression, persimmon seeds were used for buttons by many in the South.
And the wood is wonderful all around. Good wood for a smoker, being a fruit wood. Good wood for woodworking applications; remember when golf club woods were made of real wood, persimmon was the preferred wood.
 
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