Public Land Useage Poll

Do you hunt and/or fish on public lands?

  • I used to but not now

    Votes: 10 8.4%
  • I currently do and plan to in the future

    Votes: 90 75.6%
  • I currently do but do not want to in the future

    Votes: 1 0.8%
  • I never have and never will

    Votes: 9 7.6%
  • I current don’t but want to in the future

    Votes: 9 7.6%

  • Total voters
    119

ncstatehunter

Twelve Pointer
So members would pay $100 per year but the public would have access to the land? I am interested to see more about your proposal.
Shoot me a pm and I’ll send you a copy of what I’ve got worked up when I get home this evening, but yea basically that’s the idea. I think you’d have to have some kind of membership benefits or people would be like “what’s in it for me” as that’s just the nature of the beast now-a-days it seems. Many have a yearly magazine, workout discounts with some companies, give a hat or shirt, etc. Myself, I never worry about those things when I join a conservation group but I know there’s different thought processes.
 

alt1001

Old Mossy Horns
Thanks! I heard about that acquisition. This is what I would like to do but with a focus on having the land be open for hunting.
Oh yea, I knew what you were talking about I was more alluding to the fact that this model is used in other places and has been successful, granted there are bigger challenges facing hunters than there are hikers. Challenges such as land usage and management, and generally the need for larger parcels.
 

KrisB

Four Pointer
One of the things that irks me about access when I look at the maps of game lands is how many little isolated parcels I see that are surrounded by private land. How are you supposed to get access to that? I assume you'd have to either get permission to walk through the surrounding private lands or else drop yourself onto the public land from a helicopter! Is the WRC hoping to stitch those isolated parcels to bigger parcels eventually? Or why do they have these isolated parcels that don't seem to have public access?
 

ncstatehunter

Twelve Pointer
Oh yea, I knew what you were talking about I was more alluding to the fact that this model is used in other places and has been successful, granted there are bigger challenges facing hunters than there are hikers. Challenges such as land usage and management, and generally the need for larger parcels.
Groups like that’s is what kinda gave me the idea to be honest, not that it probably hasn’t been thought of before and is already out there. I know it is because we have one such land trust already like that in the state but I’m just not impressed with how they run their access to it.
 

alt1001

Old Mossy Horns
One of the things that irks me about access when I look at the maps of game lands is how many little isolated parcels I see that are surrounded by private land.
In my experience, generally there is a right of way however it usually leads to a gate with enough space for one truck to park. No doubt it can be tough.
 

alt1001

Old Mossy Horns
Groups like that’s is what kinda gave me the idea to be honest, not that it probably hasn’t been thought of before and is already out there. I know it is because we have one such land trust already like that in the state but I’m just not impressed with how they run their access to it.
If you can work out the details, go for it. The land I hunt is bordered by CMLC hiking land. They have done a masterful job at not only establishing their own stand alone parcels for their members but in acquiring land and having it transferred to the state and federal jurisdiction for hunters, fisherman and hikers alike to enjoy.
 

alt1001

Old Mossy Horns
Also CMLC has done a good bit for hunters here in Henderson County albeit indirectly. Mills River is one of the hotbeds for deer in WNC because of it's rich agriculture valley and it being old hunting lodge of George Vanderbilt and his management so many years ago. CMLC was instrumental in getting the 1,500 acre donut hole on Foster Creek transferred to the USFS. The greater plan was to ultimately work with landowners to purchase land that would connect it back to the larger section of Pisgah NF in Mills River and they were able to achieve that. If I understand correctly, they have also worked with John Humphrey to place his land into a conservation easement as well. His land borders the Foster Creek tract. It's truly remarkable what they have been able to accomplish.



Also, I found this quote interesting and didn't know if you have given this any thought. It might be a good place to start asking questions and soaking up information.

'The Humphreys got some help when Conserving Carolina helped to secure grants from the U.S Fish and Wildlife Service and U.S. Forest Service to control non-native plants around the bog. The Humphreys hired a contractor who specializes in invasive plant management, Jane Hargreaves, who has since become a friend. Conserving Carolina staff and volunteers also lend a hand at regular workdays.'
 
Top