Posted signs

Southern

Eight Pointer
I still use posted signs in addition to purple paint. What do you guys find are the best posted signs/material for durability and as little fading as possible?
 

Eric Revo

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
aluminum lasts the longest even past the faded paint, tyvek lasts the shortest and the thicker poly signs are good if they are nailed to a piece of plywood which is then nailed to a tree. I find it's easier to use the aluminum ones than to deal with tearing or cracking every couple of years, and they are harder to tear off of the tree or post for those peckerheads that want to deny seeing a sign when they decide to trespass.
 

lasttombstone

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
I have no idea where they came from but I still have some signs from 1980 that look brand new. They are the thick, yellow signs and seem to be the same stuff the signs I got from the Sherrif's Dept. when I put it in the registered land program. How many are you needing?
 

KTMan

Twelve Pointer
Contributor
I do not post any of my land. I have one farm posted because land owner put it in the lease. They going to trespass with or without the sign. I figure just save my time. Plus I personally do not like the looks of yellow signs all over the place. I do put a sign at gates.

But I know people that use vinyl and seem pleased with it. If not putting up a lot I would opt with the medal signs.

I have a drive way with a cable that has a posted sign with my number. I get at least a call a week asking about the property. Seems the sign draws more attention
 

ellwoodjake

Six Pointer
Use the cheapest you can find. Once you decide to post signs, you are committed for the long term. Trees fall, bark slips, vines grow, extreme weather happens, and let's face it, dickheads will be dickheads. This is something you're just gonna have to stay on top of. Don't put too much into it as you will be constantly redoing it. Around here, the ginsengers carry a stout garden tool handle with a flattened steel ferrule on the end, to move rocks with. They also slide right in behind a sign and pop them off easily; plywood and all. And....I hate to admit it, but when I was a teenager, we made quite the sport out of shooting the center out of shingle nails on posted signs. Extra points if the sign fell when the final nail was shot
 

Helium

Ten Pointer
I still use posted signs in addition to purple paint. What do you guys find are the best posted signs/material for durability and as little fading as possible?
We have liability insurance through “American Hunt Lease Accociation” and purchased their vinyl type posted signs 4 years ago and used them for VA

They are just as flexible today as they were then... only ones down were a few that ripped through the nails due to tree growth

I simply posted them back up
 

LanceR

Six Pointer
Contributor
When we first bought our farm in Central new York we had a significant trespassing hunter problem until I had the Sheriff's Department and local Conservation Officers hammer a large group that had drive hunted the place three years in a row. And, like others I had problems with magically disappearing sings those first years.

About that time I found the folks at postedsign.com who make stock and custom posted signs from a material similar to high end Rubbermaid Roughneck trash cans. Back then they charged $25 for the setup for custom signs with your contact info (required in NY) but waived the setup fee for orders of 50 or more. We sold the farm two years ago 14-15 years after I put those signs up and they were still hanging and in good shape-except the ones I replaced due to squirrels teething on them-and a few my neighbor brush-hogged along with the steel posts in some high weeds along our property line.

The signs in the open were sun faded to a pale yellow but the ones along our wooded property lines were still a deep yellow.

They come with a variety of reinforced holes for different mounting methods including nail holes and slots for zip ties. The back edge of the sign is curved to keep it in the orientation in which you hang it on a trunk. When nailing one to a tree if you use a nail with a wide head and leave about 3/8" slack under the head of the nail it will be several years before you have to pull the nails and re-nail them to keep the nail head from pulling through the sign as the tree grows.


Lance
 

LanceR

Six Pointer
Contributor
Not wanting to re-hang the signs very often I settled on 8d aluminum nails and washers but even as a contractor finding aluminum framing nails locally was tough. The internet has made finding them easy, though. Most roofing nails anymore, whether steel or aluminum, are so cheaply made the the head often pops off from the stiff sign working in the wind. If you have copper nails left over from some project do NOT use them. They are toxic to the tree.


Lance
 

Downeast

Twelve Pointer
I still have a box of the old WRC registered land signs and they have lasted over 10 years. They are heavy duty thick plastic. I use the longest roofing nails I can find and only hammer in half the length to allow for the tree to grow. I also carry a light 6' aluminum ladder which puts the signs 10' above the ground.

I checked with the local WEO about just using the POSTED portion of the sign and he said that would be fine. So. I took several dozen and just cut off the bottom portion and now they measure about 4" by 10" with the simple word "POSTED" in big black letters on a white background. I can now carry 50 or so with me at a time when I post the lines. I still have to post a section deep in a swamp and it's rough going. But when it's dry you would be amazed who is wandering around out there even in the deepest swamps.

It still irritates me that a landowner is burdened in having to post their own land. The burden should be on the trespasser and not on the landowner. Even the renegades have smart phones these days and with some of the free apps you can always find your exact location by a small icon on a satellite map. I do it all of the time when I'm on Gamelands. It sucks that we have to buy signs, hammers, nails, ladders, and pay taxes on our own property to keep others from stomping all over it. Simply put, if something is not yours then leave it the hell alone! To do otherwise makes you nothing more than a simple thief.
 
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country

Eight Pointer
Not wanting to re-hang the signs very often I settled on 8d aluminum nails and washers but even as a contractor finding aluminum framing nails locally was tough. The internet has made finding them easy, though. Most roofing nails anymore, whether steel or aluminum, are so cheaply made the the head often pops off from the stiff sign working in the wind. If you have copper nails left over from some project do NOT use them. They are toxic to the tree.


Lance
Voss signs I posted about sell aluminum nails also. Hope this helps
 
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