Japanese Maple

Mr.Gadget

Old Mossy Horns
I have a Japanese Maple in the front yard. This is the first time I have seen seeds on it. Was thinking about giving it a shot to try to grow some.

Anyone mess wity starting trees, is it worth trying to do it?
How would one go about it and what would be the best way?
Is there a time frame or anything you need to do to the seeds or just plant in a starter pot?
Thanks
 

Moose

Administrator
Staff member
Contributor
Neighbor down the road from me does it with Red Maple. Not sure what all is involved but he seems to have a number of folks stopping to buy.
 

LIZZRD

Six Pointer
Mine has seeds also this year. Wondering if they are hybrid trees (mine is Bloodgood) will the seedlings amount to much ?
 

darkthirty

Old Mossy Horns
I got one in the landscaping beside the house. I’d love to pull the whole thing up out of the ground but I’d also need a new place to live or hide because my wife has threatened to kill me every time I mention “let me go get the tractor and yank that sucker out of the ground”.................
 

Mr.Gadget

Old Mossy Horns
I got one in the landscaping beside the house. I’d love to pull the whole thing up out of the ground but I’d also need a new place to live or hide because my wife has threatened to kill me every time I mention “let me go get the tractor and yank that sucker out of the ground”.................
Why?
I like ours. Had it 10 years. It does not grow that big and looks great.
 

Mack in N.C.

Old Mossy Horns
you can grow them from seeds but Native plants in the yard are better than non native ones especially for suburban wildlife. ............
 

hawkman

Eight Pointer
I don't know the growth habit of your Japanese Maple and I assume this would not work but for some types of shrubs, you can take a low-lying branch, place a brick or something on it so that the branch is forced to make contact with the ground where it will root. later you can cut the branch between the brick and the base of the shrub, and you'll have a well-rooted, larger piece of material to grow your new plant from.

My neighbor gave me a few oak saplings that had sprouted in her flower garden. I planted them and they are beautiful. Now about 20 ft tall with a beautiful shape.

I think some trees have a longer Taproot than others which may make it hard to dig without breaking and replant deep enough. A pine tree might be like that.

hawkman
 

hawkman

Eight Pointer
I had a friend with a beautiful suburban property. lots of large trees all around the house providing complete shade in the backyard. There were numerous Japanese maples planted in that shade, growing not so tall but with beautiful canopies that spread out quite wide. A few dogwoods scattered in there. Wow.

hawkman
 

hawkman

Eight Pointer
I believe that's a big problem with bradford pears (amongst its other issues). The next generation resorts to one of the parents which I believe is a thorny plant.

hawkman
 

Firedog

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
The one I had in a natural area died several years back.. (technically I killed it by mistake.. let too much stuff build up on the ground before I burned the area, got a little too hot for that tree.. it lasted a couple more years but eventually died.. I noticed last summer a few saplings.. this year I have 15 or 20 of them growing.. trying to protect and nurture them all as I love the look of those trees and they are in good spots.
 

LIZZRD

Six Pointer
This is mine , heading down to the wooded area. It was a sapling 6 years ago , a memorial gift.
Note ... many people plant things even knowing they will not be there to reap it's benefits .
20200523_134249 (2).jpg
 

luckybuck

Old Mossy Horns
If you want fun, try to stratify apple seeds...I play around will all kinds of them....rarely do you get the same as the parent...
 

25contender

Twelve Pointer
Let the seeds drop and grow under the tree then this winter pot them. Works great. Most of the saplings will be green but should be a few red ones mixed in.
 
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