In-line regulations

lasttombstone

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
Maybe I shouldn't read so much but I saw this on another forum and wasn't sure about it. I know there had been some discussion here a while back about the 1898 ruling on metallic cartridges but this seems to be something different in defining the ignition system. Basically, from what I can understand, in in-line which uses a modern type primer will now be classified a firearm and be subject to the same regulations as a modern rifle. Here is a brief excerpt from the ATF memo.

However, muzzle loading weapons with “in line” firing
mechanisms designed or redesigned to use modern conventional firearm
primers do not meet the definition of antique firearms and are
subject to regulation as a firearm. Primers are not an antique
ignition system and are ammunition for firearms subject to regulation.

For anyone who wants to read the entire thing it can be found here: https://www.atf.gov/file/83981/download

To save you some time, it is almost at the bottom of the memo.
 

roundball

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
".....Basically, from what I can understand, in in-line which uses a modern type primer will now be classified a firearm and be subject to the same regulations as a modern rifle....."
Meaning inlines using modern primers would no longer be allowed in muzzleloading seasons ?
 

Big Country

Ten Pointer
Meaning inlines using modern primers would no longer be allowed in muzzleloading seasons ?
From what I read it appears the ATF is going to consider inlines that take 209 primers firearms. This means you would have to fill out a 4473 form, just like you would when buying modern shotgun or rifle.

Sent from my SM-G930P using Tapatalk
 

roundball

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
From what I read it appears the ATF is going to consider inlines that take 209 primers firearms. This means you would have to fill out a 4473 form, just like you would when buying modern shotgun or rifle.

Sent from my SM-G930P using Tapatalk
OK...that sounds like it's oriented towards the administrative aspect of things, rather than hunting regs.
 

CRC

Old Mossy Horns
That dates from the late 1990s.

In 1999 Congress (Republicans mostly) changed the law to make most 209 primer muzzleloading guns antiques

Edited
 
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KTMan

Twelve Pointer
From a hunting aspect, it is defined as loaded from the muzzle end of the gun. This is what keeps in-line MLs qualified to be used during hunting season.
 

CRC

Old Mossy Horns
From a hunting aspect, it is defined as loaded from the muzzle end of the gun. This is what keeps in-line MLs qualified to be used during hunting season.
Not in North Carolina anymore.

We now have a 'blackpowder' firearms season, not a muzzleloading season

As used in this Rule, blackpowder firearms means "Any firearm - including any firearm with a matchlock, flintlock, percussion cap, or similar type of ignition system - manufactured in or before 1898, that cannot use fixed ammunition; any replica of this type of firearm if such replica is not designed or redesigned for using rimfire or conventional centerfire fixed ammunition; and any muzzle-loading rifle, muzzle-loading shotgun, or muzzle-loading or cylinder-loading handgun that is designed to use blackpowder, blackpowder substitute, or any other propellant loaded through the muzzle or cylinder and that cannot use fixed ammunition."
 

lasttombstone

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
Right now, I don't think this is a "hunting" issue, rather how ATF views in-lines that use a modern ignition system. As KTman stated, they will now be regulated as a modern firearm and you have to go through the paperwork as if it were a normal rifle.
 

nccatfisher

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
Always been legal for hunting in NC
Not so, when the season first started here it clearly stated "black powder only" black powder substitute wasn't even technically legal. But they changed the wording pretty quick maybe even the next year. You also couldn't archery hunt during the black powder season at that time. The NCBA pitched a fit about that also. But you weren't even around at that time.
 

CRC

Old Mossy Horns
Inlines of some form or fashion have always been legal weapons in NC for hunting deer during the muzzleloader /blackpowder season.
 
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nccatfisher

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
Inlines of some form or fashion have always been legal weapons in NC for hunting deer during the muzzleloader /blackpowder season.
Correct, but smokless inlines have not as you agreed had, not during the "muzzleloading/blackpowder season.
 
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CRC

Old Mossy Horns
Smokeless inlines were not around in 1985 when the first "modern" inlines came out.

The WRC quickly allowed smokeless guns when the technology came out.

As long as it was loaded from the muzzle, did not use fixed ammunition and was a rifle or shotgun, it was OK.
 
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D. Buck Stopshere

Four Pointer
A prime example of a rifle affected by the ATFE regulation is the T/C Encore muzzleloading rifle. One can take the muzzleloading barrel off and replace it with a T/C Encore .270 Winchester caliber cartridge barrel, or any other caliber in the T/C line.

This applies to any other inline muzzleloading rifle manufactured rifle (CVA?) that has the same capability. The ATFE "defines" any inline muzzleloading rifle with the same "convertibility" as a cartridge firearm and thus, requires a ATFE Form #4473 to be filled out and the NICS background check ( or photo of NC CCW) performed. This governs ONLY a sale between a customer and an FFL dealer. Private sales are not affected.
 
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