Flite Control Buckshot

Thread starter #1
Lehtal on deer? Velocity only 1145 which is much lower than loads i usually use. Normally they run 1300+. Anyone ever used these? Not sure about them for hunting


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Thread starter #4
Cool i appreciate it. That was my original thinking, a tight pattern like that would wreck them like a train but i figured they would not carry the energy


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aya28ga

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
#5
No buckshot "carries the energy" much past 50 yards. With buckshot, the tight pattern is everything. With Flite Control buckshot, use cylinder or improved cylinder, that's what it was designed for. Inside of 20 yards the pattern is almost too tight, with a spread of 4 - 5 inches. At 30 to 40 yards is were it shines, all pellets within an 8" circle.

The biggest problem is finding it for sale.

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#6
Worked good for me this year although i am not using it dog hunting. I hunt on the ground in thick cover so I have been using the shotgun with buckshot. I used it with IC choke in my gun.
 

JONOV

Six Pointer
#7
Just pattern your gun with it...

I shot my only deer last year with buckshot, about 20 yards. The deer fell where he stood...But when I got him out of the woods the pattern was a bit wider than I would have expected from a modified choke at 20 yards.*

*I had forgotten my rifle, but had my duck hunting stuff in the car, so dug around and found some buckshot under the seats, and thought, "I'm here, might as well hunt and hope he steps out close." He did.
 

nccatfisher

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
#8
No buckshot "carries the energy" much past 50 yards. With buckshot, the tight pattern is everything. With Flite Control buckshot, use cylinder or improved cylinder, that's what it was designed for. Inside of 20 yards the pattern is almost too tight, with a spread of 4 - 5 inches. At 30 to 40 yards is were it shines, all pellets within an 8" circle.

The biggest problem is finding it for sale.

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I beg to differ with you on that as far with "energy". If you have the pattern buckshot has plenty of energy to kill past 50 yards. There are people that are and have worked on loads and killing deer at 60, 80 and even 100 yards.

I am not there yet, but working on it. I can consistently put all 18 pellets from my 3.5" 12 ga OO in an 18" square at 60 yards with a full buckkicker with reloads. I haven't had the time, money or the shoulder yet to work up any other loads in different sizes yet but will continue on this summer and figure on gaining a few more yards to next season.
 
#9
I've seen more deer drop on the spot with buckshot than slugs which I find surprising. Not that I've shot a bunch with either, but they almost always run when hit with standard type slugs. Just my own observations....
 

All Pines

Four Pointer
#10
With flitecontrol , No1 Buck patterns even better than 00 for me. Through my 590a1, both No1 and 00 will “put a few” on a deer out to 75 yds.

I actually prefer a wider pattern when dogging deer (3” 4B is great out to about 40yds)
 

aya28ga

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
#11
I beg to differ with you on that as far with "energy". If you have the pattern buckshot has plenty of energy to kill past 50 yards. There are people that are and have worked on loads and killing deer at 60, 80 and even 100 yards.

I am not there yet, but working on it. I can consistently put all 18 pellets from my 3.5" 12 ga OO in an 18" square at 60 yards with a full buckkicker with reloads. I haven't had the time, money or the shoulder yet to work up any other loads in different sizes yet but will continue on this summer and figure on gaining a few more yards to next season.
I think we're in agreement.

I should have stated "no single buckshot pellet carries the energy much past 50 yards." I agree there's hunters out there that can consistently put 80% of a pattern on target at 50+ yards, and its the tight pattern that matters.
 

nccatfisher

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
#12
I think we're in agreement.

I should have stated "no single buckshot pellet carries the energy much past 50 yards." I agree there's hunters out there that can consistently put 80% of a pattern on target at 50+ yards, and its the tight pattern that matters.
OK, I totally agree with that. Other than the occasional LUCKY buckshot pellet one just won't do the trick. I killed a doe years ago when I was shooting a 10ga with #4 buck. I had no idea of killing her. I was just shooting trying to turn her back so she wouldn't go off our club and drag the dogs with her. She was running across a field and the third time I shot she piled up like she was hit with a hammer. And there was several witnesses. She was a stepped 115 paces and I step a good heavy yard.

Upon skinning she had one pellet right behind the ear. And I would venture to say that was most likely a stray.
 

nccatfisher

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
#13
With flitecontrol , No1 Buck patterns even better than 00 for me. Through my 590a1, both No1 and 00 will “put a few” on a deer out to 75 yds.

I actually prefer a wider pattern when dogging deer (3” 4B is great out to about 40yds)
I am just the opposite, I want mine tight as entirely possible, I want to miss or bulldoze them. I shot one the other day with a guy standing right beside me, he had missed it twice and his gun jammed before I ever shot. It was about 50 yds and caught the whole load in the shoulder. It looked like a feather pillow exploding when the hair flew off that deer and it crumpled like it hit a wall. But it is like shooting a tight choke on ducks in a small hole, you better be on or you will miss some also.
 

22LR

Twelve Pointer
#14
I have used flightcontrol buckshot for many years. I got my tightest patterns with a modified choke. I found a real game changer this year from a company called http://www.dixieslugs.com
Their buckshot is called tri-ball. It is a 3 pellet load, each pellet weighs 320 grains. I can get a 7 inch pattern at 40 yards. Using a modified choke. For OO & OOO buckshot loads buy a Kicks buckkicker full choke and you wont regret it. Screenshot_2018-09-26-23-50-42.png
 
#15
I am just the opposite, I want mine tight as entirely possible, I want to miss or bulldoze them. I shot one the other day with a guy standing right beside me, he had missed it twice and his gun jammed before I ever shot. It was about 50 yds and caught the whole load in the shoulder. It looked like a feather pillow exploding when the hair flew off that deer and it crumpled like it hit a wall. But it is like shooting a tight choke on ducks in a small hole, you better be on or you will miss some also.
I'm with you on this one. I spent most of this summer developing and patterning loads for both my daughter and my shotgun. We are trying to get them as tight as possible. I showed my dad one pattern and he replied "that is to tight". At 50 yards if I do my part there will be at least 10 to 12 pellets in the kill area of a deer (heart and lungs). There will be 8 to 10 at 60 or so yards. I plan to work on those a little more this summer but I am very confident in what we are shooting out to about 75 yards. Not "counting on that 1 stray pellet". Goal is to keep at lease 5 in a kill size area. I can not believe it took me 35 years to start loading my own buckshot. Easy, cheap, satisfying and the results have been pretty amazing to me.
 

DRS

Old Mossy Horns
#16
The 12ga Federal FCW 3" 00 Buck I shoot are advertised @ 1325 FPS (MV). My shotgun pattered these best with a Imp. Cylinder choke. I tried all brands, size buck shot #4 to 000 ( both 2 3/4" and 3"), even tried two different buckshot chokes. Every gun is different, patterning is a must. Bottom line tight patterns kill, know the limit by shooting at different distances. I know mine will roll them up when I do my part.
 

nccatfisher

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
#17
I'm with you on this one. I spent most of this summer developing and patterning loads for both my daughter and my shotgun. We are trying to get them as tight as possible. I showed my dad one pattern and he replied "that is to tight". At 50 yards if I do my part there will be at least 10 to 12 pellets in the kill area of a deer (heart and lungs). There will be 8 to 10 at 60 or so yards. I plan to work on those a little more this summer but I am very confident in what we are shooting out to about 75 yards. Not "counting on that 1 stray pellet". Goal is to keep at lease 5 in a kill size area. I can not believe it took me 35 years to start loading my own buckshot. Easy, cheap, satisfying and the results have been pretty amazing to me.
I have been out of the shotgunning them loop for almost 20 years to this year. I knew soon as I started back that I was going to be going The reloading route. I waited a little late but still got it going this year. I hope to have something even better to next. If not I know what I have is considerably better in my gun than anything it will shoot OTC.

The bad thing about testing buckshot loads chokes aren't cheap and it gets tough on your shoulder.
 
#18
Keep your eye out for a Lead Sled on sale. I found one couple years ago for about $65. Well worth the investment. Not only does it help with the buckshot loads it has been great for my daughter and my mother to practice with.
 
#19
Keep your eye out for a Lead Sled on sale. I found one couple years ago for about $65. Well worth the investment. Not only does it help with the buckshot loads it has been great for my daughter and my mother to practice with.
Agreed 100%, bought mine on sale for $49.95 and its paid for itself multiple times d/t zeroing many rifles