Dog Shoots Duck Hunter

mdunker

Ten Pointer
Thread starter #1
Had not seen this posted. A crazy story.

https://www.clarionledger.com/story...shot-hunting-dog-leg-amputated-ms/2512820002/


***PLEASE READ***SHARE IF YOU’D LIKE***

I know there have been many people wondering about the details of the hunting accident involving Matt Branch. Below is the most detailed description that I can recall from what happened.

On December 28, 2018 I was on an annual duck hunt with 4 very close friends in Eagle Lake, MS.

Matt Branch, David Joe Branch, Connor Branch, David Lamonte and myself.

We were hunting a cypress slough in the middle of a field. The game plan was to hunt spread out down the slough early, then regroup once the sun came up and hunt the remainder of the morning in one group where we could all be well hid. So far, everything had gone as planned, we had all killed a few birds early and were off to a great start on the morning. My buddy Matt Branch had walked down to where David Lamonte and myself were hunting and David Joe Branch had driven the ranger down to where we were so we could load up the decoys and gear to go set up in another area. At approximately 9:40 AM, David Joe, David, Matt and I were all standing around the bed of the ranger and Matt had laid his gun down flat in the bed of the ranger and walked around on the passenger side to finish loading up. The dog jumped up into the bed of the ranger, getting ready to head out and stepped on the gun that had been placed into the bed, pushing the safety to fire, as well as hitting the trigger, resulting in the gun going off. The 12 gauge shotgun which contained 1 shell that was left in the chamber, fired through the side of the bed on the ranger hitting Matt in the upper inside of his left thigh approximately 2-3” from his groin. Matt screamed and fell to the ground. In the midst of the chaos at this point, I ran over to Matt to assess what had happened. We had no clue what the damage was at this point in time. I immediately yelled to David Joe to call 911. As quick as possible, we picked up Matt and loaded him into the ranger. I jumped in the bed and David Joe took off driving. Our goal at this point was to get Matt to the nearest place we knew an ambulance could get to without getting stuck in the field. Being David Joe was driving and holding Matt, I was on the phone with 911 on the ride to the highway. We had about a mile or so to go through a muddy field. Once we arrived at the highway we unloaded Matt onto the ditch bank and laid him with his legs on the higher end of the ditch bank. His head and shoulders were laying in David Joes lap and I had Matt's leg up on my shoulder, holding pressure on the outside of his waders where I presumed the wound to be. Within 5-7 minutes of us being on the ditch bank, 2 volunteer firefighter/first responders arrived with some medical supplies. We then immediately cut the waders and pants out of the way, got gauze and pressure applied directly to the wound and got an oxygen mask on Matt. A sheriff and a game warden arrived to the scene shortly after, neither of which had any concern for the critical condition that Matt was in at this point in time. This is a whole other subject that can be discussed once we have Matt back in a completely healthy state. The ambulance arrived probably 10-15 minutes from the time the volunteer first responders got there. Once the ambulance arrived, a tourniquet was placed on Matt’s leg and we loaded him onto the stretcher and into the truck. The ambulance immediately took off to River Regional in Vicksburg, MS.

Since then, Matt has undergone multiple critical surgeries including the amputation of his left leg and re-connecting his femoral artery in his left upper leg. Matt is currently in a stable condition at University of Mississippi Medical Center in Jackson MS.

I have no words to describe what overcame us in such a critical time to be able to act and handle the situation as we did. This was a pure act of God’s hand and there is no questioning that.

I not only want to get the word out to as many people as possible for the love, prayers and support that we will need to get Matt on track to his long road of recovery, but also to remind all of my fellow hunters of the absolute seriousness of being the utmost careful when it comes to gun safety. I myself have been guilty of this so many times. Sadly, I can’t begin to tell you how many times I have left shells in my gun while moving to a different location to hunt, or even wading around moving decoys between flights. I was even fortunate enough to grow up hunting my whole life around my dad and other men that always took the time to teach us the importance of gun safety. I know we all remind ourselves every time we hunt of the basics of being safe, not pointing our guns at one another, not swinging wide on a shot etc.…

But do we really ever grasp the seriousness of just how important it is?

I would like to encourage everyone that reads this to take the time to not only double check themselves going forward, but take the time to double check everyone else you’re hunting with as well.

DO NOT be afraid to be THAT guy on EVERY hunt that reminds EVERYONE multiple times just how important safety is.

Please DO NOT let complacency get the best of you. There was 80+ years of hunting experience amongst our group the morning this happened.

“Safety isn’t always safe. Treat ALL guns like they are loaded, at ALL times.”

PLEASE DO.

Do it for me. Do it for you. Do it for your family. Do it for your fellow hunters.

There is no doubt Matt has an extremely long road to recovery ahead of him but there is nobody more confident than me that he will shake back and continue to live an amazing life and continue to impact others. If you know Matt, I know you feel the same.

I have known Matt for a very long time and I can assure you of this, he is big, he is tough, he is a fighter, and most importantly, he is no quitter. While we were laying on that ditch bank on the road side waiting for help, I told him that he was too tough to let a few BB’s hurt him, and I promise you, THAT he is.

This has been an absolutely traumatic experience for everyone involved including Matt’s friends and family. I cannot even begin to describe just how grateful we all are for the out-pour of love, support and prayers during this time.

From the deepest part of all our hearts,

Thank you so much.
 
#4
Buy a tourniquet, a real tourniquet. Don't assume you can improvise one. I'm a fan of and carry the NAR CAT.
Learn to use it (both on yourself and somebody else) and at least put one in your truck if not your hunting bag too.
You could absolutely save your own or somebody else's life with it.
 

ScottyB

Twelve Pointer
Contributor
#5
I guess I am missing the BS part........it’s a great reminder to everyone to go the extra step to ensure safety......just looked at my Berretta and it is easily possible to trip the safety and pull the trigger with the pads on a dogs foot......regardless .......still a good reminder
 

GSOHunter

Twelve Pointer
Contributor
#6
Buy a tourniquet, a real tourniquet. Don't assume you can improvise one. I'm a fan of and carry the NAR CAT.
Learn to use it (both on yourself and somebody else) and at least put one in your truck if not your hunting bag too.
You could absolutely save your own or somebody else's life with it.
I carry an Israeli bandage, trauma kit and tourniquet in a kit in my hunting bag.
 

Eric Revo

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
#7
He's a very lucky fella to have severed his femoral artery and not bleed out in the time it took to get him out. It's amazing that the first responders didn't apply a proper tourniquet and that one wasn't applied until the EMS got there.
God was watching over than young man for sure.
 
#8
Agree on keeping a tourniquet and other basic supplies in blind bag. However that is a difficult area to control bleeding due to anatomy, most folks don’t carry a junctional tourniquet around with them. That’s why pelvic trauma is so dangerous.
 
#9
He's a very lucky fella to have severed his femoral artery and not bleed out in the time it took to get him out. It's amazing that the first responders didn't apply a proper tourniquet and that one wasn't applied until the EMS got there.
God was watching over than young man for sure.
They may not have had one. There are still people who believe they're going to lead to amputation if one is applied. Or it could've been outside their scope of practice.
 

Eric Revo

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
#12
They may not have had one. There are still people who believe they're going to lead to amputation if one is applied. Or it could've been outside their scope of practice.
I would hope that game wardens and deputy sheriff are required to have a higher level of first responder training and carry the appropriate first responder kits with them since both jobs require them to work outside of the realm of a quick response by EMS. Of course that may be just wishful thinking on my part.
There does appear to be some concern that those two officers didn't do what they could to assist in the care of this badly injured man. But that too may be sour grapes and the story may be biased for reasons unknown to us.
 
#14
They may not have had one. There are still people who believe they're going to lead to amputation if one is applied. Or it could've been outside their scope of practice.
An airforce pararescue guy talked to our squad one night. Stressed only certain types of tourniquets. Said that tourniquets have been left on for up to 8 hours with no ill effects for that long time. And don't write on the forehead the time of application. Although that is what our book included. That part came from someone other than the airforce guy. He said it is difficult to make an effective tourniquet out of "scratch" materials. And secure the tourniquet tight!!
 
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#15
Decreasing downstream flow would be the least of my worries with a gsw to femoral bundle. You will not develop tissue necrosis in that short a period of time. If the patient exsanguinates nerve damage/tissue hypoprofusion is the least of your worries. Stop/slow the loss,blood products and level 1 trauma.
 
#22
We have 24 inch ones at work if that is what’s got you asking
I wouldn’t advocate using a zip tie as a tourniquet.
They’re not wide enough, at least none I’ve seen are. The removal process may be tricky as well.

If a makeshift one has to be used, a triangular bandage and some duct tape takes up little room and weighs near nothing.

A legitimate tourniquet costs $30~ And packs down very small.
I’m not saying you’re wrong, or that I would rather bleed to death.
I just see no reason not to have a better option at hand.
 

41magfan

Twelve Pointer
#23
I like the RATS (Gen 2) Tourniquet .... it's inexpensive, fast and almost intuitive to apply (especially on yourself) and it doesn't take up a lot of room in your kit.

An ingenious way to carry the thing (so you'll always have it with you) is to tuck it inside the waistband with the cleat just above the belt-line and the running end dangling down the inside of your pants leg.
 
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beard&bow

Ten Pointer
Contributor
#24
He's lucky to be alive. It only takes 120 seconds to bleed out.

For thought and discussion, I carry 2 CATs, shears, hemostatic gauze, and some other things with me. Plastic wrap can be a good for a sucking chest wound. Cut a roll in 3rds and it's easy to pack. Duct tape, as already mentioned, can be used in many ways. If you ever use a tourniquet, don't take it off. Let the emergency room do that. It can also be helpful to write "T" and the time on the victim's forehead. That way, they know how long it's been on.

There are many here that can speak more intelligently on the subject. I'm just relaying what I know.
 
#25
Its all about muzzle control. We have guys in our club on four wheelers that have the gun rack mounted on the front of the bike. They think nothing of pulling up beside you or parking around a group of people with that damn barrel pointing right at you. This goes for laying on a truck seat or even hidden in a toolbox unseen. Point that thing in a safe direction, if an accidental discharge I promise the outcome will be a lot better.
 
#27
that was the first lesson preached at the hunter safety class I attended. and they were on the muzzle control side.
saying that even a loaded gun cant kill you if it isn't pointed at you. I had always been taught the empty gun stuff before then. I am silly on gun safety so I pay attention to anything related to it. I guess it's a chicken and egg deal.


This incident was even on Clay Travis's sports talk show given it's bizzare situation. Such a fluke. just a shame all the way around.
 
#28
Its all about muzzle control. We have guys in our club on four wheelers that have the gun rack mounted on the front of the bike. They think nothing of pulling up beside you or parking around a group of people with that damn barrel pointing right at you. This goes for laying on a truck seat or even hidden in a toolbox unseen. Point that thing in a safe direction, if an accidental discharge I promise the outcome will be a lot better.
Right on brother. I had the same issue with some dudes on my club. Being right handed, they would put the stock to their right on the handlebars, and then try to pass other atvs on the right. More than once, I've went left into the water ditch and finally we both had to stop head on. When they wanted to know what I was doing, I would always say, trying to keep your muzzle from pointing toward me." BTW I always kept my rifle on my back, when riding, pointing straight up
 
#29
Yes and no.
If there’s no round in the chamber, a gun barrel is no different than a stick or a broom handle.
It’s all about removing round out of chamber.
When I hunt I leave the broom at home and grab the gun and it will be loaded. The ole it’s not loaded trick doesn’t work for me. I don’t like looking down the businesses end regardless. If I see a gun it’s loaded as far as I’m concerned.
 
#30
When I hunt I leave the broom at home and grab the gun and it will be loaded. The ole it’s not loaded trick doesn’t work for me. I don’t like looking down the businesses end regardless. If I see a gun it’s loaded as far as I’m concerned.
Just saying if the gun won’t loaded, wouldn’t have mattered where the barrel was pointing. But I bet right now, those boys are gonna have a lot of “if’s” on their mind for the rest of their lives over that one moment.