Deli Style Venison

Homebrewale

Old Mossy Horns
I decided this weekend to make some deli-style venison for sandwiches this coming week. I took 3 roasts out of the freezer. I placed them in a pot of water and sous vide'd them for 14 hours at 130F. Then I coated them with black pepper, coriander, dry mustand, garlic powder and onion powder. I placed them in the smoker and smoked them using cherry wood for 3 hours at 130F. To get more of a dark exterior, I seared them on the grill for about 1 minute per side. After I took them off the grill, I cooled them for several hours. I sliced each one thin.

Here is the final product.
IMG_2379.jpg
 
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Homebrewale

Old Mossy Horns
It was very tender and the smoke taste came through. It was hard to stop eating. The dog loved it too. Today I have a venison, swiss cheese and horseradish sauce sandwich. I gave some to a friend and next door neighbor. Maybe I should show up and bring it to a summer get together someday.
 

CJF

Old Mossy Horns
sous vide (pronounced sue-veed) is a cooking technique that utilizes precise temperature control to deliver consistent, restaurant-quality results. High-end restaurants have been using sous vide cooking for years to cook food to the exact level of doneness desired, every time.

Sous vide, which means “under vacuum” in French, refers to the process of vacuum-sealing food in a bag, then cooking it to a very precise temperature in a water bath. This technique produces results that are impossible to achieve through any other cooking method.

Sous vide cooking is much easier than you might think, and usually involved three simple steps:
1. Attach your precision cooker to a pot of water and set the time and temperature according to your desired level of doneness.
2. Put your food in a sealable bag and clip it to the side of the pot.
3. Finish by searing, grilling, or broiling the food to add a crispy, golden exterior layer.

Sous Vide Steak vs. Traditionally Cooked Steak​

The steak on the bottom was cooked sous vide at 129ºF, while the steak on the top was pan-cooked. As illustrated in the comparison above between cooking sous vide steak and pan-cooking steak, there are important advantages to cooking sous vide over traditional methods.steak.jpgsteak 1.jpg
 

Homebrewale

Old Mossy Horns
CJF, thanks for providing the sous vide tutorial. The difficult part of making this deli meat was smoking the meat. I wanted to smoke it at the same temperature (130F) as the sous vide. I have a Masterbuilt electric smoker. I used a smoker tube to provide the smoke. The heat coming off the smoker tube was enough to push the internal temperature in the smoker as high as 149F at times. I monitored the internal temperature of the meat to be sure it wasn't pushed above 130F which didn't happen.

I was trying to decide the thickness of each slice. I settled for a thinner cut over a thicker one. For my first try at this type of product, I think it worked out great. Definitely gives me an incentive to use more tags.
 

Homebrewale

Old Mossy Horns
In case you can't tell, the meat on the right is from the sirloin and the meat on the left is from two top rounds. Each one came out slightly different in color. My favorite is the sirloin.
 

Wirehead

Four Pointer
I decided this weekend to make some deli-style venison for sandwiches this coming week. I took 3 roasts out of the freezer. I placed them in a pot of water and sous vide'd them for 14 hours at 130F. Then I coated them with black pepper, coriander, dry mustand, garlic powder and onion powder. I placed them in the smoker and smoked them using cherry wood for 3 hours at 130F. To get more of a dark exterior, I seared them on the grill for about 1 minute per side. After I took them off the grill, I cooled them for several hours. I sliced each one thin.

Here is the final product.
View attachment 75772
Sliced with a deli slicer?

looks incredible. Been wondering about this type of cook + prep. I’m inspired.
 

Eric Revo

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
Man that looks good. I love my sous vide and so does everyone that I use it to cook for. I actually had a deer tenderloin that I couldn't eat this past year because it was just that tough, but that's the only one I've had a complaint on.
I season mine well before putting it in the vacuum bags so it's like a marinade/cooking time in the hot water bath, and I've done the smoker thing too, just not at those low temps, that's a great idea to maintain a full rare thickness. I usually just stick it in the smoker with a really heavy smoke for about 15 minutes at 225 but it does cook it a little bit.
 

strut buster

Eight Pointer
Excellent work. I just made my first of 2 yearly batches of pastrami. More of less what you did here but started with a 2 week seasoned/cure dry brine, finished by smoking to 155 F. Outer rub prior to smoking very similar to yours but added some picante smoked paprika. I did not sous vide this prep, but use it often prior to kamado or blackstone sear of chops. Sous vide will make a hindquarter roast steak melt like inner loin for sure.
 
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