CWD discussion thread on CWD and NC deer hunting- discuss CWD and North Carolina here

Is CWD a real threat to NC's deer and elk populations and hunting?

  • Yes

    Votes: 5 23.8%
  • No

    Votes: 12 57.1%
  • Unsure

    Votes: 4 19.0%

  • Total voters
    21

nccatfisher

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
#3
I worry about NOT getting older a whole lot more.

As a side note people actually pay for Mike Marsh's opinion and I could still care less about the subject. Someone tell me what good worrying about it will do?
 

dobber

Eight Pointer
#4
The earth is falling the earth is falling - oh yeah by the way "It’s unknown whether it generated spontaneously"

Anyone who gets grants and gets paid to do studies to essentially say "we don't know" everything else they talk about is at best a guess, and if they just said "we dont know" no one would pay them.
CWD was around long before deer farms were a thing, will be around long after i am gone and in some areas where it was found, deer herds wiped out, the deer came back and hunting continued - how would this be possible if its in the dirt? In my best impression of one of these scientists "i dont know"
 

lasttombstone

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
#6
Personally, I put a lot of credit into what the people I pay have to say. I had a long conversation with my region biologist back in October when he was trying to find places to gather deer heads for testing. He confirmed that they have been testing deer in NC since 1996 and are mandated to test something like a few thousand deer yearly. The fact that we do not know everything about the disease is all the more reason to be vigilant. With all the comments here about preserving the future of hunting for the future generations, why would anything that could change that at any point not be a major concern. If there is such a concern that this is not really a problem, why not go to the regional hearings and suggest that the Commission do away with the testing for CWD and use that money to buy more game lands or plant more dove fields. I know I'm not the smartest man around but I do know that my area biologists is smarter than I am regarding wildlife issues so I'm going with his opinion.
 

timekiller13

Twelve Pointer
#7
CWD will kill deer. It probably has already killed deer in NC. But, it is not the end of the world. Read the article, the prion persists in the environment for years, even decades possibly. You cannot eliminate it. Biologists have no idea how it is spread. It is most likely spontaneous in many cases. How do you eliminate a spontaneous disease? You can't. What frightens me is the approach many of the agencies take when it comes to CWD. They won't to eliminate enitre HERDS of animals. They did it in Norway, i think. A couple caribou tested positive, and the government killed the entire HERD. All 2500 wild animals, wiped out, by guns, not a disease. How in the hell did that help anything? They did it in Wisconsin, too. Some positive tests and BAM, the wildlife guys pretty much let unlimited slaughter of deer occur. Missouri wanted to kill every deer in a 6 COUNTY RADIUS after some positive CWD tests. WTF? Thankfully hunters cried foul on that one.

CWD has been around for a long time. It will continue to be around until the end of time. Live with it.
 

turkeyfoot

Twelve Pointer
#8
I'm almost missing a good elk thread after this CWD over and over. I have said forever its most likely here been here for while only breaking news to me would be if they found way to wipe it out or confirmed humans can contract till either them its same old same old. Maybe baiting will get done away with when they confirm it that would be big news
 
#12
Here's the rub. You can ignore CWD, hope it will go away on its own, discount what the biologists say, but when a CWD deer shows up 20 miles from where you're hunting, and it's an 18-month-old buck, and all the scientific research tells you that it takes at least 18 months for the symptoms to show up in a deer, then you know, wow, the little buck had the disease passed down from its mother, so there is another infected deer somewhere close by, plus all the other little ones she had and may have passed it onto. Then, how fast are you going to cut up those loin chops and slap them on the grill? Face it, CWD is the deer/elk version of Mad Cow Disease. You want to chew on a nice piece of steak not knowing? I've got buddies in Mississippi, where the fourth CWD deer was just discovered, and one lives in one of the "containment zones" where two of the four CWD deer have been found. He just limbered up his front end loader, dug a hole and dumped in every piece of venison killed on his 800 acres. He said it's just not worth the risk. That's the rub with CWD.
 
#13
Here's the rub. You can ignore CWD, hope it will go away on its own, discount what the biologists say, but when a CWD deer shows up 20 miles from where you're hunting, and it's an 18-month-old buck, and all the scientific research tells you that it takes at least 18 months for the symptoms to show up in a deer, then you know, wow, the little buck had the disease passed down from its mother, so there is another infected deer somewhere close by, plus all the other little ones she had and may have passed it onto. Then, how fast are you going to cut up those loin chops and slap them on the grill? Face it, CWD is the deer/elk version of Mad Cow Disease. You want to chew on a nice piece of steak not knowing? I've got buddies in Mississippi, where the fourth CWD deer was just discovered, and one lives in one of the "containment zones" where two of the four CWD deer have been found. He just limbered up his front end loader, dug a hole and dumped in every piece of venison killed on his 800 acres. He said it's just not worth the risk. That's the rub with CWD.
Odds are 50% or more of this forum has probably already eaten an ungulate of the deer family that had CWD.
 
#14
Here's the rub. You can ignore CWD, hope it will go away on its own, discount what the biologists say, but when a CWD deer shows up 20 miles from where you're hunting, and it's an 18-month-old buck, and all the scientific research tells you that it takes at least 18 months for the symptoms to show up in a deer, then you know, wow, the little buck had the disease passed down from its mother, so there is another infected deer somewhere close by, plus all the other little ones she had and may have passed it onto. Then, how fast are you going to cut up those loin chops and slap them on the grill? Face it, CWD is the deer/elk version of Mad Cow Disease. You want to chew on a nice piece of steak not knowing? I've got buddies in Mississippi, where the fourth CWD deer was just discovered, and one lives in one of the "containment zones" where two of the four CWD deer have been found. He just limbered up his front end loader, dug a hole and dumped in every piece of venison killed on his 800 acres. He said it's just not worth the risk. That's the rub with CWD.
Dumb. I have knowingly eaten elk and deer from CWD areas. It has never been shown to be transmitted to humans. The one study where it was given to monkeys was HEAVILY influenced by circumstances that were way beyond natural.

If you are worried about getting a TSE, then you might as well just quit living right now. 85% of all cases of CJD (human version of CWD) are spontaneous. No exposure, no history, just happens.

And i have to ask, for all of you worried about contracting CWD, if it does show up in NC, are you going to quit deer hunting?
 

FITZH2O

Eight Pointer
#24
Here's the rub. You can ignore CWD, hope it will go away on its own, discount what the biologists say, but when a CWD deer shows up 20 miles from where you're hunting, and it's an 18-month-old buck, and all the scientific research tells you that it takes at least 18 months for the symptoms to show up in a deer, then you know, wow, the little buck had the disease passed down from its mother, so there is another infected deer somewhere close by, plus all the other little ones she had and may have passed it onto. Then, how fast are you going to cut up those loin chops and slap them on the grill? Face it, CWD is the deer/elk version of Mad Cow Disease. You want to chew on a nice piece of steak not knowing? I've got buddies in Mississippi, where the fourth CWD deer was just discovered, and one lives in one of the "containment zones" where two of the four CWD deer have been found. He just limbered up his front end loader, dug a hole and dumped in every piece of venison killed on his 800 acres. He said it's just not worth the risk. That's the rub with CWD.
It’s been around for over 50 year that we know of and has never infected a human. Your buddy is guilty of wanton waste, that’s only rub here.
 

Tipmoose

Administrator
Staff member
Contributor
#25
Here's the rub. You can ignore CWD, hope it will go away on its own, discount what the biologists say, but when a CWD deer shows up 20 miles from where you're hunting, and it's an 18-month-old buck, and all the scientific research tells you that it takes at least 18 months for the symptoms to show up in a deer, then you know, wow, the little buck had the disease passed down from its mother, so there is another infected deer somewhere close by, plus all the other little ones she had and may have passed it onto. Then, how fast are you going to cut up those loin chops and slap them on the grill? Face it, CWD is the deer/elk version of Mad Cow Disease. You want to chew on a nice piece of steak not knowing? I've got buddies in Mississippi, where the fourth CWD deer was just discovered, and one lives in one of the "containment zones" where two of the four CWD deer have been found. He just limbered up his front end loader, dug a hole and dumped in every piece of venison killed on his 800 acres. He said it's just not worth the risk. That's the rub with CWD.
That's a shame right there. Heat denatures proteins. All proteins. The CWD prion is a protein. I'll just cook my meat and not worry about a protein that hasn't ever been shown to be transmissible to humans even before it was cooked.

Im more worried about being bitten by a damn tick and developing alpha gal allergy.
 

woodmoose

Administrator
Staff member
Contributor
#27
^He's the reporter who wrote the article for Star News Online.

Yes I know that

Guess I should of worded it "iWhy should I care what mike marsh says"?

Never liked what I've read of him in the past and sure ain't worried on what he writes today

Now if the headline was "CDC says nc hunters should worry about CWD" well then maybe
 

aya28ga

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
#28
That's a shame right there. Heat denatures proteins. All proteins. The CWD prion is a protein. I'll just cook my meat and not worry about a protein that hasn't ever been shown to be transmissible to humans even before it was cooked.

Im more worried about being bitten by a damn tick and developing alpha gal allergy.
Or Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, Ehrlichiosis, Powassan Disease, Tularemia, etc, etc.
 
#30
Can you show your work on this one?
We have confirmed CWD just across the border in VA, we now have cases confirmed in SW TN. And that’s just in states we share a border with. A good many of us head out of state to hunt a state that has either confirmed it or is adjacent to a state that has confirmed it. It is likely my Nebraska buck from last year or my Missouri one from this year had the prion based on where they were taken for example. Now add into the fact the prion does not need a host and can live in soil, on vegetation, etc and you have a multitude of ways for it to be ingested or carried from one place to another. We know it can only be incenerated at extremely high temps as well. So yes, there is a high likelihood that you or I or any number of people have eaten an ungulate with CWD prions. There’s my unscientific math on what I said. And my unscientific opinion is that this most likely spontaneous protein that can be passed between deer species has been around for much longer than when it was first “discovered” and the cause of it seeming to spread is based mostly on a higher rate of testing in places that did little to no testing before.