Corn on the cob?

Blackwater

Twelve Pointer
OK, where's the Russian store located? They might carry the Vegeta in the new Super G store but I won't be back there for a couple of weeks.

I prefer the Serendipity brand of corn, never did warm up to Silver Queen. I grew up eating yellow corn bread every day and yellow grits most every morning, so I much prefer the flavor of yellow corn. Most people pick their corn several days after it's at it's most tender, especially the folks who sell at the farmer's markets and supermarkets also. I usually blanch it for 10-12 minutes then cool it down in two sinks of cold water then stand on end in pots to drain before vacuum packing. My vacuum packer doesn't seal too well if there is any water being drawn out of the bag.

I usually put up about 125 to 150 ears so there's plenty on hand for the year.
 

Jimbob78

Twelve Pointer
OK, where's the Russian store located? They might carry the Vegeta in the new Super G store but I won't be back there for a couple of weeks.

I prefer the Serendipity brand of corn, never did warm up to Silver Queen. I grew up eating yellow corn bread every day and yellow grits most every morning, so I much prefer the flavor of yellow corn. Most people pick their corn several days after it's at it's most tender, especially the folks who sell at the farmer's markets and supermarkets also. I usually blanch it for 10-12 minutes then cool it down in two sinks of cold water then stand on end in pots to drain before vacuum packing. My vacuum packer doesn't seal too well if there is any water being drawn out of the bag.

I usually put up about 125 to 150 ears so there's plenty on hand for the year.
Serendipity is really good and I plant the BT version of it.
 

MtnMan

Ten Pointer
When we are in Maggie Valley we eat at Butts On The Creek . Sweetie always gets their deep fried corn on the cob with the bbq .
 

thandy

Ten Pointer
Mexican Street Corn is hard to beat. Its not just Mayo on corn....

  • Grilled corn – you can grill this in a grill pan or on a grill but be sure to get it nice and charred for maximum flavor!
  • Mexican Crema – this is similar to sour cream but with a milder, less tangy flavor.
  • Creamy Mayo – this really adds a lot of flavor to the elote corn
  • Lime juice + zest- for a little tang
  • Fresh garlic
  • Cilantro
 

todobien

Eight Pointer
Straight off the cob that is straight off the stalk standing in the field with the juice running down your face (sweat too). If you've never had a chance to eat it that way you have missed one of the finest things in life. Unfortunately I rarely have that opportunity anymore but as a child did it often with my grandfather. It would still be good at lunchtime if picked that morning in baskets and spread out vs piled in a truck bed or bag. By dark those starches would be starting to form and it wouldn't be the same but still way fresher and tastier than anything you get in a store or at a farmers mkt. I shake my head when I see backs of trucks loaded to the brim with folks selling out of it.
 

Jimbob78

Twelve Pointer
Straight off the cob that is straight off the stalk standing in the field with the juice running down your face (sweat too). If you've never had a chance to eat it that way you have missed one of the finest things in life. Unfortunately I rarely have that opportunity anymore but as a child did it often with my grandfather. It would still be good at lunchtime if picked that morning in baskets and spread out vs piled in a truck bed or bag. By dark those starches would be starting to form and it wouldn't be the same but still way fresher and tastier than anything you get in a store or at a farmers mkt. I shake my head when I see backs of trucks loaded to the brim with folks selling out of it.
We’d fill a truck bed up by 6:30, have it shucked and cut off the cob by 11:00 and my grandmother would spend all afternoon blanching and cooling it to bag and freeze. She’d talk ugly to my granddad about picking so much but year after year we’d do the same amount.
 

Hunterreed

Twelve Pointer
Straight off the cob that is straight off the stalk standing in the field with the juice running down your face (sweat too). If you've never had a chance to eat it that way you have missed one of the finest things in life. Unfortunately I rarely have that opportunity anymore but as a child did it often with my grandfather. It would still be good at lunchtime if picked that morning in baskets and spread out vs piled in a truck bed or bag. By dark those starches would be starting to form and it wouldn't be the same but still way fresher and tastier than anything you get in a store or at a farmers mkt. I shake my head when I see backs of trucks loaded to the brim with folks selling out of it.
I would eat on an ear like usually within an hour of it being pulled. Shucking and silking with brushes sitting in the yard while the sweat bees aggravated the crap out of us. If I am not going to shuck right away I stand the ears in buckets or tubs of water like you would fresh flowers
 

Jimbob78

Twelve Pointer
I would eat on an ear like usually within an hour of it being pulled. Shucking and silking with brushes sitting in the yard while the sweat bees aggravated the crap out of us. If I am not going to shuck right away I stand the ears in buckets or tubs of water like you would fresh flowers
I am spoiled, we always do it in the office at the barn in the AC
 

QuietButDeadly

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
I took the little red wagon to the roasting ear patch and piled it full of ears. Pulled it back under a shade tree where Momma would start shucking, silking and blanching while I went for another load or more. Most varieties of sweet corn back then had a very narrow harvest window to get the best corn. When it was ready, you had to get it done.

When I brought the last load in, I would take over the shucking, silking and blanching and Momma would start cutting it off the cob in a big dishpan. We always froze our corn. Most of the work was done outside except the cutting off the cob and putting it in the freezer bags or boxes.

The shucks and cobs were fed to the hogs. And this process always started early in the morning right after breakfast to beat the heat.

Some of the varieties available today have a bigger harvest window and keep better but IMO, none of them hold a candle to the flavor of the old fashioned varieties that were harvested and processed at prime time. But I have gotten hold of some yellow corn this year a time or two that was not bad at all. All I could find tody was bicolor and I will eat that but it is not nearly as good as the yellow IMO.
 

Jimbob78

Twelve Pointer
I took the little red wagon to the roasting ear patch and piled it full of ears. Pulled it back under a shade tree where Momma would start shucking, silking and blanching while I went for another load or more. Most varieties of sweet corn back then had a very narrow harvest window to get the best corn. When it was ready, you had to get it done.

When I brought the last load in, I would take over the shucking, silking and blanching and Momma would start cutting it off the cob in a big dishpan. We always froze our corn. Most of the work was done outside except the cutting off the cob and putting it in the freezer bags or boxes.

The shucks and cobs were fed to the hogs. And this process always started early in the morning right after breakfast to beat the heat.

Some of the varieties available today have a bigger harvest window and keep better but IMO, none of them hold a candle to the flavor of the old fashioned varieties that were harvested and processed at prime time. But I have gotten hold of some yellow corn this year a time or two that was not bad at all. All I could find tody was bicolor and I will eat that but it is not nearly as good as the yellow IMO.
That’s why there are different varieties for different folks. I much rather have a specific variety bicolor than yellow, and either of those over silver queen. Candy corn was one my grandfather used to grow followed by Kandy king. The yellow has more corn flavor the white sweeter, so I like the mix. We always blanch after we cut it off because it cuts easier and to get more of the starch in the corn.
 

QuietButDeadly

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
We always blanch after we cut it off because it cuts easier and to get more of the starch in the corn.
I know some folks do it that way but that is bassackwards to my way of thinking. Blanching after cutting waters down the natural juices IMO. But if that is the way you like it, go for it.
 

Jimbob78

Twelve Pointer
I know some folks do it that way but that is bassackwards to my way of thinking. Blanching after cutting waters down the natural juices IMO. But if that is the way you like it, go for it.
I don’t understand how it waters down the natural juices. Some of the water is evaporated out of the corn so it concentrates the natural juices. I only add about 1/4 cup so it doesn’t stick when I first get it cooking, then go until I get a low boil. I would be willing to bet 1/2 cup of water is boiled off.
 

Tony Hawkins

Eight Pointer
A little warning if you have dogs. We had corn on the cob the other day, and our 14 week old lab puppy grabbed one of the cobs and swallowed it whole before I could even turn around. We had to go to the vet where they induced vomiting and she threw it back up. Apparently the cobs are indigestible.
 

Jimbob78

Twelve Pointer
A little warning if you have dogs. We had corn on the cob the other day, and our 14 week old lab puppy grabbed one of the cobs and swallowed it whole before I could even turn around. We had to go to the vet where they induced vomiting and she threw it back up. Apparently the cobs are indigestible.
Mine will shred a cob, shuck and all then eat the corn kernels
 

todobien

Eight Pointer
I took the little red wagon to the roasting ear patch and piled it full of ears. Pulled it back under a shade tree where Momma would start shucking, silking and blanching while I went for another load or more. Most varieties of sweet corn back then had a very narrow harvest window to get the best corn. When it was ready, you had to get it done.

When I brought the last load in, I would take over the shucking, silking and blanching and Momma would start cutting it off the cob in a big dishpan. We always froze our corn. Most of the work was done outside except the cutting off the cob and putting it in the freezer bags or boxes.

The shucks and cobs were fed to the hogs. And this process always started early in the morning right after breakfast to beat the heat.

Some of the varieties available today have a bigger harvest window and keep better but IMO, none of them hold a candle to the flavor of the old fashioned varieties that were harvested and processed at prime time. But I have gotten hold of some yellow corn this year a time or two that was not bad at all. All I could find tody was bicolor and I will eat that but it is not nearly as good as the yellow IMO.
Freezer boxes....been a long time since I've seen any of those.
 
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