Beaver eating?

Thread starter #1
I dont think ill ever try it but has anyone here eaten beaver?(the animal...)


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Greg

Old Mossy Horns
#3
Oh, boy .... here we go ...

But to give you a serious answer to your question, a buddy of mine made jerky from a beaver that was flooding his woods.

It was awful ... like chewing shoe leather.
 
#4
Cooked in a crockpot with mushroom soup, potatoes, onions and carrots I can't tell it from beef or deer. And my grandkids loved it too. I think I had some at the last NCSU Wildlife Club Dinner.
 

QuietButDeadly

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
#5
Like most wild game, handling and processing along with cooking have a lot to do with the outcome. Beaver is especially so with the castor glands and the oil sacs. You get oil from the sacs or castor on the meat, you will not likely be happy with your meal. I am a lot more careful skinning one for the table.

But properly skinned and prepared is a different story. Cubed and cooked in a slow cooker like beef stew is good eats!
 

lasttombstone

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
#6
You really need to go the the aforementioned Wild Game Dinner that will be in CARY, probably Feb. or March. I have been telling folks that "meat is meat", it all depends on how you manage it, as QBD said.
 
#21
Came here to say Steven Rinella has a recipe for beaver tail in his new cookbook. Also heck out MeatEater on Netfilx, by far the best show on Netflix right now
I watch that show when I get home from work. Comes on one of my hunting channels at 6 & 6:30. The meals he prepares look mighty tasty.
 

Prune

Four Pointer
#26
Backstraps are great on grill or in stew ...Clean up fat off back legs and grind into burger for chili and tacos..Is a very lean high protien meat

Heart , liver and organs give to the dog.
Tails for dog chews or beaver tail oil.
 

Larry R

Old Mossy Horns
#27
I was going to ask a serious question but I'm not going to ask because I know I'm not going to get a serious answer and I don't intend to be the one who causes the subject to go off into the wild blue yonder.
 
#28
Like most wild game, handling and processing along with cooking have a lot to do with the outcome. Beaver is especially so with the castor glands and the oil sacs. You get oil from the sacs or castor on the meat, you will not likely be happy with your meal. I am a lot more careful skinning one for the table.

But properly skinned and prepared is a different story. Cubed and cooked in a slow cooker like beef stew is good eats!
Harold...so you usually just use extra caution when cutting out glands and sacks...then get a fresh knife to butcher with or just wash the knife off?
 

QuietButDeadly

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
#29
I remove any meat for consumption before I remove the castor and oil sacs. Clean knife and new gloves after skinning to remove what I intend to eat.