Bathroom Projects

.35Rem

Eight Pointer
I’m finishing up the first of 3 bathroom remodels. First one was the easiest and a big learning opportunity, especially with tiling 🙄. Will post my pics of that once complete.

As I finish that one, I’m looking towards the next. The full bath upstairs has a wall separating the vanity area from the toilet & shower.

IMG_2531.jpeg

We’d like to remove it but I’m not sure if it’s load bearing. Wall to wall is 64”. It is perpendicular to the floor joists in the attic above. A couple of questions:

1. When I do the demo, what are my clues it’s load bearing?

2. If it is load bearing, I think I can mitigate that with some form of a header. Correct?

3. If it is load bearing and I modify it, do I need to get an inspector involved?

Looking forward to jumping into this one, but need this unknown cleared up before I make my punch list.

Thanks in advance. We’ll be increasing degree of difficulty with this one and testing my novice tiling & drywalling “skills”.
 

Homebrewale

Old Mossy Horns
I can't comment on the load bearing part. I will say that I had a bathroom just like your bathroom. When we remodeled, we had the wall taken down. Since it was parallel with the floor joists above, it was not load bearing. I like the final result much more than the original configuration.
 

.35Rem

Eight Pointer
We def think one long narrow room will be less claustrophobic than 2 smaller rooms. I think it’s doable, just wanna do it right.
 

Homebrewale

Old Mossy Horns
My wife wanted to keep it two separate areas. I enlisted my two daughters to win the disagreement over how to remodel. Her argument was that two people could use the bathroom at the same time. One could use the sink while one used the shower. She thought that was important on resale if a family had a son and daughter. She grew up in a one kid family so she didn't quite grasp waiting one's turn. There were five of us kids growing up sharing one bathroom.
 

Homebrewale

Old Mossy Horns
I don’t have before photos of our bathroom. Also I can’t get anymore new photos since I sold the house. As said before, it originally looked like your bathroom. We removed the wall, replaced the tub with a shower, and replaced the cabinet with a new one. About the only thing original is the toilet. Here are 3 photos:

IMG_1618.jpegIMG_1619.jpegIMG_1617.jpeg
 

bigten

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
I feel for you. I absolutely hate bathroom remodels. (If I'm the one doing it)
 

.35Rem

Eight Pointer
I’m actually enjoying it to a degree. The first one took a while and some extra $ as I did a few do-overs, but I’m learning. Most will miss my mistakes on the first one; sadly my BIL’s who have done this all thier lives won’t though😜.
 

dc bigdaddy

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
I’m actually enjoying it to a degree. The first one took a while and some extra $ as I did a few do-overs, but I’m learning. Most will miss my mistakes on the first one; sadly my BIL’s who have done this all thier lives won’t though😜.
Unless he's paying for it, his opinion is worthless :)
I'm sure I'm going to have to replace a shower/tub unit in the near future. I'm not looking forward to it.
 

stormm4

Big Ole Nanny Doe

Hunterreed

Twelve Pointer
If the wall that's upstairs has attic over it there will be minimal load on it. Depending on how the ceiling joists are constructed there is no load from the roof if the wall being removed is not directly under any vertical supports. Any load bearing wall should be running 90 degrees from the ceiling joists. May be a good idea to brace the joist to ones on either side to prevent any twisting it may do after it is released from the wall header
 

.35Rem

Eight Pointer
If the wall that's upstairs has attic over it there will be minimal load on it. Depending on how the ceiling joists are constructed there is no load from the roof if the wall being removed is not directly under any vertical supports. Any load bearing wall should be running 90 degrees from the ceiling joists. May be a good idea to brace the joist to ones on either side to prevent any twisting it may do after it is released from the wall header
Well dang, you unfortunately cut the “X-ring” on that one. Yep, I checked, it’s right under the vertical supports in the attic. I guess that carries the load from the roof down through the lower floors. That’s exactly why I posted & asked.

If I make the opening bigger I’ll need to compensate with a larger header of some sort. When I do the demo I’ll take a closer look and come up with a design change……..then get wife’s official okie-dokie.

Thanks!!!!
 

Hunterreed

Twelve Pointer
Well dang, you unfortunately cut the “X-ring” on that one. Yep, I checked, it’s right under the vertical supports in the attic. I guess that carries the load from the roof down through the lower floors. That’s exactly why I posted & asked.

If I make the opening bigger I’ll need to compensate with a larger header of some sort. When I do the demo I’ll take a closer look and come up with a design change……..then get wife’s official okie-dokie.

Thanks!!!!
If the rafters and ceiling joists are stick built from dimensional lumber yeah that may be important. But if the roof and joist system is fabricated trusses made with the metal T lock plates you could still be in good shape. Post a picture if you can
 

.35Rem

Eight Pointer
Nope. Ordinary 1975 stick built. No manufactured trusses.

IMG_2535.jpeg
Im thinking I need to make a plan to pick up that load if I widen the opening.
 

Hunterreed

Twelve Pointer
Those almost look like wall studs added after the roof rafters were built unless it's just the lighting in the picture they are a different color than the rafters like it's newer wood. But if you are in doubt add 2x4 uprights to the other side of the rafters and ceiling joists on either side of the one over the wall essentially doubling the support of those two and then span a 2x6 across all three uprights tying them together. Then the ones on either side of the one in question will be supporting the load with double the strength of a single support. The vast majority of the load from the roof is on the outside walls where the rafters sit anyway so you should be good
 

.35Rem

Eight Pointer
I think it’s the lighting because when you are up there they look the same. I think your idea is doable. I’m gonna use that as my plan A. Will confirm when I do the demo in the near future. Thx very much.
 

Hunterreed

Twelve Pointer
To clarify what I am saying about the upright supports is they appear to be added after the rafter system was built originally to be just a wall for sheetrock as if that attic was being made into a bonus room. Even if it that's not the case judging from the span that one rafter and ceiling joist will not suffer from having the wall removed from below. Just simply spanning a 2x6 across the top of the ceiling joist in question to the ones on either side will prevent it from twisting in the case of any tension in the wood being released if in fact it happens to be fastened to the wall plate below that you are removing. Like I said in the previous post most all load from the roof is on the outside wall plate especially from the span and spacing distances of the rafters, pitch of the roof that particular rafter and ceiling joist will never know that wall is gone
 

.35Rem

Eight Pointer
The attic is def an unfinished room. I think it was planned and not executed (hvac, electrical, other framing in place). I will prob err on the side of caution and compensate as if it were load bearing. Without doing demo I think what you laid out is a reasonable approach and doesn’t over do it. I will reassess once I start pulling some things down.
 

Hunterreed

Twelve Pointer
Bathroom remodeling definitely takes a lot of extra time consuming details with all the different surfaces and fixtures compared to other rooms in the house. Plus the small space and bright lights show every little imperfection in your work. My wife wanted to remodel our full bath but insisted that we have an additional 1/2 bath before I started so we would have a toilet and sink to use during the process. This old farmhouse has three large rooms on the main floor with no hallway just doors going from one room to the next so I picked the center room that was the front entrance den to start that project. Built a wall seperating one third and installed a toilet, sink and then set up a utility room beside it moving the washer/ dryer into it. Before I could cut a new entrance into the utility room and completely close off the half bath from it she decided we could start remodeling the full bath. Got walls painted, new flooring and surround around the tub and got sidetracked. In the last month now she decided I should concentrate on finishing the other 2/3 of the front room beside the half bath for her a crafting room. At least it only required a little sheetrock and painting, adding a few receptacles and maybe refinishing the hardwood floor. So I have three different rooms in three different states of non completion 20240515_102232.jpg20240515_102423.jpg20240515_102438.jpg
 

Hunterreed

Twelve Pointer
Notice the access door in the front room wall to the plumbing for the half bath sink is the positive side of doing your own work. I try to make future problems and repairs easy for myself.
 

.35Rem

Eight Pointer
I did notice that, was actually considering that on the final remodel in the master suite.

My wife has been more than patient with me on this. Was supposed to be done before turkey season, then by the time it ended, now it’s by next week. Some delays were in material avail, but mostly me having to redo something.

This next one will add hvac moment, rewiring ( the wall we want remove has a fan & light switch), tiling the shower, etc. plenty of opportunities to learn.
 
Top