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Att : successful Clover plotters

Helium

Twelve Pointer
We have multiple food plots (most are 1/8 - 1/4 acre) … typically we disc in fall due to weeds and plant cereal grains and brassicas which of course do well.

then in Spring we use to disc again BUT this year we frost seeded heavily with Ladino clover. It has been exceptionally mild weather and wet in SW VA. Clover is up well BUT the cover crop of cereal grains is 15” tall and not dieing anytime soon.

so what should we do next mow or spray clethodim?

PS.. our goal is to thicken and establish clover plots…decrease weeds and grasses (clover seems to die out or go dormant in Late July or Early August) …. But instead of discing again for fall… is to have enough clover to broadcast cereal grains into it for the fall
 

Eric Revo

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
I'd probably mow in that situation instead of spraying, you could actually do nothing and probably be ok since the grains will simply get taller and not shade out the clover anyway.
We always sprayed in late August/September when the grasses were still actively growing but putting nutrients into the root system. It seemed to kill them better for the next year.
IMHO Imox is your best bet for clover plots, it's cheaper than most and only needs one application.
 

KTMan

Twelve Pointer
Contributor
I’d leave it alone. The grain will provide shade for the the clover. The clover will give the nitrogen needed to help the grain produce a good head which benefits wildlife.

I actually top sow all my existing clover stands with wheat every year just for this purpose.
 

bwfarms

Twelve Pointer
Monoculture is only good if you’re cropping. Stop stressing, clover will fill in when seeds fall and stems dry up. If you were trying to get the grass/grain tillers to thicken up you would cut the heads down. If you want the clover to overtake you let the unfertilized grass or grain stand and go to seed production.

I guess the following could be a plot, I will certainly use it to my advantage come hunting season. I had to sacrifice a pasture last winter and needed to fill in the bare spots so I broadcast red clover and some novel endophyte less fescue back in March. This field was drilled a couple of years ago so broadcasting was acceptable. It takes longer for the clover to bloom in a spring application versus fall which would’ve already been in bloom now. It’s still on target, those stems are 4.5-5’ and clover is at about a foot. No fertilizer has been added to this pasture yet this year because I’m allowing the clover to establish and the fescue seed to fall, cheaper seed bank this way. I will clip after I let the cows mob graze, need the fescue stems to help prevent bloat.

589CBE6A-AB07-4820-B848-36B0DA2A77B0.jpeg
 

Helium

Twelve Pointer
Deer don't like fescue. Never seem them eat it
You haven’t been to the Black Hills of South Dakota have you? Totally dispels that myth

ps No fescue isn’t preferred choice around here BUT it will sustain a herd. I saw more deer in South Dakota than I’ve seen anywhere (including South Texas)
 
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billyf

Four Pointer
Pretty much true of all grasses, no?
I have a clover plot that has a cool season native grass growing in it during the hunting season. The grass competes with the clover. Plot is now 50%native grass and 50% clover. The deer seem to prefer the native grass over the clover even though they eat both. I believe fertilizing the grass and the clover makes them both attractive(taste) to the deer,, I have had this plot for 10+ years. This plot is next to a swamp so its a heavy soil/low area. This cool season grass is native to the low area/swamps in ENC as its voluntary. Maybe someone on here may know the grass I am talking about..
 

bwfarms

Twelve Pointer
I have a clover plot that has a cool season native grass growing in it during the hunting season. The grass competes with the clover. Plot is now 50%native grass and 50% clover. The deer seem to prefer the native grass over the clover even though they eat both. I believe fertilizing the grass and the clover makes them both attractive(taste) to the deer,, I have had this plot for 10+ years. This plot is next to a swamp so its a heavy soil/low area. This cool season grass is native to the low area/swamps in ENC as its voluntary. Maybe someone on here may know the grass I am talking about..
Bulrush, Manna, or Blue Joint?

Check them out and tell us which it is.
 

jug

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
Deer will graze on fescue and orchardgrass hard if there is little grain crops being planted in my experience. Deer won't touch fescue in Harnett but they will mow it down in Chatham and Rockingham from what I have seen.....
I always mow my rye over my clover field in the Spring during turkey season . Turkeys love a fresh cut . Worked good for me this year cause I got me one on April 17th out of that field for the first time. The rye seeds out later and shorter when mowed during early April.
 
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