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Advice needed - Middle school shooting team

CountryRN

Twelve Pointer
Any advice provided is appreciated in advance.
My son had joined the shooting team at his middle school. I am proud of his efforts and desire to take on this challenge. However he is struggling a little with the .22 marlin he is using. It is an older firearm and was given to him by my FIL. I believe that the gun may be a little heavy and on the long side for his use in competition - therefore he is struggling with accuracy and I fear he is becoming discouraged.

I need some recommendations on a .22 rifle that a youth can handle and grow with. The 10/22 models have my interest with their modular designs and ability to be customized. I do not have a lot of money for this project, nor do I believe that he needs a high end match grade firearm. But I want something that will be appropriate for him to use and provide reliable accuracy for him to compete with.
So which .22 models should I be looking at.
 

nhn2a

Eight Pointer
How old is he? Also when you say he struggling, can you be more specific with what issues? Is it accuracy, do they shoot multiple positions and does he have the same issues in each? Does he drink a lot of soda?

I was on the rifle team in high school and we would shoot sets in standing, kneeling, and prone. It's amazing the affect caffeine has on holding steady especially in standing.
 

CountryRN

Twelve Pointer
How old is he? Also when you say he struggling, can you be more specific with what issues? Is it accuracy, do they shoot multiple positions and does he have the same issues in each? Does he drink a lot of soda?

I was on the rifle team in high school and we would shoot sets in standing, kneeling, and prone. It's amazing the affect caffeine has on holding steady especially in standing.
He is 11 years old at this time. When I say struggling, I mean he is not able to hold a good grouping in the multiple positions. Standing, Kneeling or prone. He does decent from the bench and there is no doubt that he would greatly benefit from more trigger time. The struggle that I believe he is having is strength to hold the long firearm steady. He is a pretty good size kid for his age (has a larger frame), but upper body strength is not his greatest attribute.
As far as caffeine goes, he could probably decrease his intake some. I will see what I can do on that front.
Thanks
 

TKL

Spike
Using a good and properly adjusted sling made a noticeable difference for my son. We also did a trigger adjustment and saw improvements again.
 

beard&bow

Ten Pointer
Contributor
In the standing position, try having him make a horizontal figure 8 pattern, where the cross section lands on the bullseye. In the kneeling position, have him use his bone structure for support. Muscles get weak quick. Have him place his [opposite from dominant] foot firmly on the ground(pointing towards the target), sit on his dominant foot(it takes practice), and support the rifle with a vertical forearm. The base of the tricep(just above the elbow) is what he should rest on his knee, not the bone of the elbow.

In the prone, have him fire at the bottom of his exhale. Not holding his breath, but at that point just before he inhales.

Have him get into a pattern where he squeezes the trigger so slow that it surprises him. If it surprises him, he won't be able to anticipate it and push it away.
 

CountryRN

Twelve Pointer
In the standing position, try having him make a horizontal figure 8 pattern, where the cross section lands on the bullseye. In the kneeling position, have him use his bone structure for support. Muscles get weak quick. Have him place his [opposite from dominant] foot firmly on the ground(pointing towards the target), sit on his dominant foot(it takes practice), and support the rifle with a vertical forearm. The base of the tricep(just above the elbow) is what he should rest on his knee, not the bone of the elbow.

In the prone, have him fire at the bottom of his exhale. Not holding his breath, but at that point just before he inhales.

Have him get into a pattern where he squeezes the trigger so slow that it surprises him. If it surprises him, he won't be able to anticipate it and push it away.
Thanks for the advice. It's stuff i have long ago forgotten to teach. I will try to work with him on those techniques.
 

MJ74

Old Mossy Horns
Any advice provided is appreciated in advance.
My son had joined the shooting team at his middle school. I am proud of his efforts and desire to take on this challenge. However he is struggling a little with the .22 marlin he is using. It is an older firearm and was given to him by my FIL. I believe that the gun may be a little heavy and on the long side for his use in competition - therefore he is struggling with accuracy and I fear he is becoming discouraged.

I need some recommendations on a .22 rifle that a youth can handle and grow with. The 10/22 models have my interest with their modular designs and ability to be customized. I do not have a lot of money for this project, nor do I believe that he needs a high end match grade firearm. But I want something that will be appropriate for him to use and provide reliable accuracy for him to compete with.
So which .22 models should I be looking at.
I have a 10/22 with a adjustable stock and a red dot on it that you are welcome to borrow.
I have some scopes I can put on it if he would rather use that....just let me know.

Sent from my LG-US996 using Tapatalk
 

lasttombstone

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
The above advice is good. Does the team not have a coach? How long has he been target shooting? I recently got into target shooting .22 last year and it has been eye opening. I thought I could shoot and guess I did fine as far as hitting a deer. But when I started trying to hit an aspirin at 25 yards I was awakened. The information I got from others on a .22 forum was enlightening and I am still learning. I now shoot CZ and have learned how to adjust the trigger to where I am at 5 oz. now. The rifle, and a good scope with an adjustable objective, was a major help. Then I learned that sub-sonic ammo is the only way to go. A good starting point will be CCI Standard Velocity. Keep all ammo below 1200 fps. SK Std. + shoots best of the low end good stuff and it will run about .10 per round. The CCI Std. can be had for about $25/brick. If he is serious about wanting to shoot start him on some light weight strength training. Anything he will do regularly will help Good luck and I hope he will stick with it.
 

Excursion

Ten Pointer
I coached middle school and high school shooting teams for about 9 years. We have more trophies than I know what to do with. For out of the box and cost CZ is your gun. Depending on how big he is the scout might be a good starter but the 452 is the better gun. I do not think they make it any more but maybe find one at a pawn shop? Gun trader etc. Call Ed's he will know.
 

Bailey Boat

Twelve Pointer
Keep the gun for the time being but make CERTAIN that the barrel is clean and dry then gather as many different types/brands of .22 as you can find or borrow a few (10) rounds and with CAREFUL record keeping find out which ammo shoots the best group. Then stick with that ammo and proceed..

PS: Remington ammo is among the worst.....
 

Papa_Smurf

Ten Pointer
Contributor
Fir kids just learning to shoot is stay away from a semi auto 10/22 and stick with bolt action to really learn the fundamentals.

I second the cz 452 (discontinued) or the cz 455 (current production).


Both are quality guns and there are comparisons on YouTube that actually show the difference.

CCI ammo is about the only .22 I shoot anymore.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

stilker

Old Mossy Horns
If he's not already wearing earplugs,he could try that too,I know .22 is not much noise but a newer shooter could lose concentration waiting for the crack.
 

FishHunt

Twelve Pointer
The Ruger American Compact .22 is worth looking into. The stock can range from youth to adult length of pull, it has good sights and you can easily attach a scope. The stock inserts allow for a low or high comb that can be switched for iron sight use or scope use. The trigger is easily adjusted. The entry price is low, priced around $300. The rifle is a little muzzle heavy (but the rifle is only 5.3lbs), that should help keeping the sights on target.

<>< Fish
 

CountryRN

Twelve Pointer
Thanks guys for all the information. I am taking all the suggestions to heart and will investigate each as much as possible. A number of you have taken the time to contact me by PM and I appreciate the information and offers received.

On a good note - My son received a youth model 20 ga for the past Christmas and has shot a few rounds through it but nothing much more than cans and bottles at the farm. He stepped up to the line today to shoot clays for the first time in his life. He went 5 for 20. For some this may not be spectacular, but for a kid who has never shot at a moving target or at anything at more than 10 yards away, I am pretty proud of him. He was dang pumped up about it as well.
 

PPosey

Twelve Pointer
in my experience Remington 22 ammo is poor compared to CCI. Try to find a Savage bolt action 22 most accurate 22 I've ever shot is a Savage bolt action heavy barrel shooting CCI subsonic hollow points, the CCI subsonic hollow points are the most accurate 22 long rifle ammo i have ever shot that was not high dollar match ammo.
 

dc bigdaddy

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
CZ 457 is the new one. CCI Standard Velocity ammo. Scope or no scope?

If your school team gets done in March, get him involved in the 4-H because they should be rolling along because those tournaments are in August. Alot of the kids shoot both.
 

pattersonj11

Old Mossy Horns
CZ 452 is your gun. Find out what ammo they are required to shoot and get the same stuff.

I shot on the middle school and high school shooting teams. Went on to shoot in college as well. Hung up the gun at that point.

I started with a Nylon 66, tried a couple more, and had a CZ during my with grade year. I shot it for 5 years and my scores went up from day one. During my senior year I averaged in the 190s out of 200 with the .22

Get familiar with a 6 o’clock target hold.

I think I could have done better but I pursued other sports and interests. I never spent the time to practice outside of shooting team practice one day each week.
 

pattersonj11

Old Mossy Horns
Unless shooting from a bench rest....he needs to shoot his gun and the same gun.

My biggest issue now is bouncing back and forth between deer rifles.
 

pattersonj11

Old Mossy Horns
Remington is some of the sorriest ammo out there.
CCI standard velocity is normally a good one for the money.

Most of the shooting teams are required to use a certain ammo in competition. It used to be Winchester target .22....but check to see what it is now.

Practice with what they shoot. The gun may not love it, but if it’s required, you just have to adapt to it.
 

41magnum

Twelve Pointer
If he's not already wearing earplugs,he could try that too,I know .22 is not much noise but a newer shooter could lose concentration waiting for the crack.
EXACTLY, it has been proven that even .22lr will damage hearing over time. When I competed I used ear plugs AND muffs, to help concentration.
 
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