6.5 Creedmoor craze makes Pennsylvania legalize .26 caliber rifles for elk hunting

CRC

Old Mossy Horns
6.5 MM CREEDMOOR COULD BECOME LEGAL ROUND FOR ELK

The Pennsylvania Board of Game Commissioners today gave preliminary approval to a measure that would permit the state’s elk hunters to use the 6.5 mm Creedmoor round and related .26 caliber firearms.

Existing regulations require elk hunters to use firearms that are .27 caliber or more, with bullets of at least 130 grains. But after a review, the Game Commission has determined that increasingly popular firearms in the .26 caliber range provide adequate and commonly accepted kinetic energies to efficiently and ethically harvest elk.

The change would allow use of .26 caliber firearms with bullets of 120 grains or more for elk hunting.

The measure will be brought back to the July meeting for a final vote.
Is the 6.5 Creedmoor that better at killing elk than a .264 Win Mag or a .260 Remington?
 

JJWise

Eight Pointer
It’s not that it’s better at killing elk than others, it lacks the power of the 264WM, 6.5x284 and 6.5PRC. It’s that bullet technology has come a long way, making 6.5mm cartridges viable for killing elk size animals, especially at ranges often found in the east. In all reality, I doubt there’s much you can do with a 308 or 30-06 that you can’t do with a 6.5CM anymore.
 

Winnie 70

Eight Pointer
I reload for a 308 and can go from 110-130-150-165-168g and see no need for a 6.5CM.....a 110 loaded to take out coyotes is the ticket and all the way up to elk with the right load. All where you put that piece of lead.
 

shadycove

Twelve Pointer
I reload for a 308 and can go from 110-130-150-165-168g and see no need for a 6.5CM.....a 110 loaded to take out coyotes is the ticket and all the way up to elk with the right load. All where you put that piece of lead.
X2 on the 308 but I would stay above the 150gr loads, always with a premium bullet.
I have a pet 110gr load that is certain death on deer under 200yds but I would not shoot an elk with it, just sayin'.
 

Downeast

Twelve Pointer
I picked up my first 6.5 Creedmoor over 10 years ago. I had to order it from the factory and at that time ammo was a bit hard to find. I now own three rifles chambered in 6.5 CM. As JJWise mentioned above, it's all about the advancement in bullet technology. The round itself is a bit of a "poop" round. Average velocity is generally 2700 fps or less with a 140 grain bullet. In a hunting situation, the 270 Win will blow the socks off a 6.5 CM. The Creed was originally designed as a target round for benchrest and F Class shooting. Bullets are long and thin for caliber, with high BC's. Thus it retains energy and velocity at extreme ranges (beyond 600 yards). It was only much later that it became known as a hunting round. Yet even today when you talk to someone at gun stores and other gun related venues it is not uncommon to hear the "experts" extol the virtues of the 6.5 CM as a high velocity round and a guaranteed killer of everything from a chipmunk to a moose. I would consider it marginal for elk and having a choice I would carry something else. I would feel more comfortable hunting elk with my .257 Wby magnum with a smaller caliber than the .264 caliber 6 CM.
The 6.5 Creedmoor is an excellent round for whitetail deer and for long range competition shooting. But for hunting game larger than whitetail there are far better choices for the average hunter and occasional target shooter. Bullet placement is always the key, but given the opportunity I would prefer to shoot an animal (like an elk) in the right spot with the best caliber available. I wouldn't carry a 6.5 Creedmoor.
 

CRC

Old Mossy Horns
The WRC has said whenever they open an elk season here there will be no caliber or bullet restrictions . They feel there is no need to restrict what hunters can use as long as state law allows it.
 

nccatfisher

Old Mossy Horns
Contributor
Why should they, they have already been killed with .22 rifles here now. They know they can be killed with anything.
 

Downeast

Twelve Pointer
I agree that there should not be any restrictions on calibers or weapons. If you want to shoot bears with a .22 short knock yourself out. What I implied when I used the 6.5 CM as an example was that there are better choices out there and a hunter should know what is appropriate for the animal he wishes to kill. In the old days it was called "common sense". I know, I shouldn't mention that term since some may find it offensive. :LOL:
 

CRC

Old Mossy Horns
Montana does not allow airguns but they allow any caliber rimfire, muzzleloader or centerfire and it doesn't seem to be a problem there.
 
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